Category Archives: Linux

OpenRemote package for Synology NAS

When I originally created Synology packages for Java in 2011 I noticed that they are being referred to by some diverse projects, and one that caught my eye was OpenRemote. Since a NAS is a low power always-on system, it’s a perfect candidate to run home automation control software. OpenRemote aims to be the integration and control layer for a huge range of devices and sensors which use a substantial variety of protocols – as the project’s strapline summarizes:
OpenRemote is the Open Source Middleware for the Internet of Things.

OpenRemote-DSM

This new version of the package is a significant update to version of 2.6.2 of the OpenRemote Controller. I selected this version because the drools component has been updated so that OpenRemote will run on Java 8. I have integrated the application with DSM’s Package Center and the software icons will be shown in main DSM applications menu when the package is running (button in the top left corner):

OpenRemote-webui

To use the software you will need to register for an OpenRemote Designer 2.5 account here. You will have to purchase this via the order process but notice the discount code for personal use which brings the price back to zero. If you had already created designs on OpenRemote versions prior to 2.5 there is a migration process to transfer this to the new version, though it looks like the OpenRemote documentation is overdue a tidy – much of it is clearly outdated.

 

Synology Package Installation

  • In the Advanced tab of the DSM User control panel enable the User Home service.
  • In Synology DSM’s Package Center, click Settings and add my package repository:
    Add Package Repository
  • The repository will push its certificate automatically to the NAS, which is used to validate package integrity. Set the Trust Level to Synology Inc. and trusted publishers:
    Trust Level
  • OpenRemote appears to need the unlimited cryptography policy files for the Java Cryptography Extension which are not included by default. If you want to use the Synology Java package you will need to manually install these policy files yourself, however I would recommend using my own Java SE Embedded package which does this automatically. Read the instructions on that page carefully too. Ensure you select Unlimited Strength Cryptography in the package installation menu:
    Java-crypto
  • Browse the Community section in Package Center to install OpenRemote:
    Community-packages
    The repository only displays packages which are compatible with your specific model of NAS. The OpenRemote package contains no native binaries at all, so it will work on any NAS that can run Java. This package does now require at least DSM 5.0.
 

Notes

  • You will only be able to sync the Controller with your Designer account once you have designed something. Until then, the sync will fail. This is normal.
  • Since this package does not include native binaries, if you need drivers for additional devices such as USB serial dongles, USB Z-Wave adapters etc., you will need to find these elsewhere. Rather than duplicating effort I will defer to the expertise of fellow Synology package developer jadahl who seems to have this part covered already.
  • Previous versions of this package required a port change to TCP18581 for the controller which required a matching config change in OpenRemote Designer. This is no longer necessary since the Controller now uses TCP8688 by default which does not clash with any Synology services.
  • OpenRemote saves your designs in the cloud with your online account, and the controller syncs with those designs. This means that you can uninstall the package without losing your designs.
  • You can see the Controller’s log in Package Center
  • DSM Package Center installs the application to /var/packages/OpenRemote/target. If you need to edit config files, or look at other logs in detail via SSH – that’s where you’ll find them.
 

Package scripts

For information, here are the package scripts so you can see what it’s going to do. You can get more information about how packages work by reading the Synology 3rd Party Developer Guide.

installer.sh

#!/bin/sh

#--------OPENREMOTE installer script
#--------package maintained at pcloadletter.co.uk


DOWNLOAD_FILE="OpenRemote_Controller.zip"
DOWNLOAD_PATH="https://github.com/openremote/Controller/releases/download/v2.6.0_beta"
DOWNLOAD_URL="${DOWNLOAD_PATH}/${DOWNLOAD_FILE}"
EXTRACTED_FOLDER="OpenRemote-Controller"
DAEMON_USER="`echo ${SYNOPKG_PKGNAME} | awk {'print tolower($_)'}`"
DAEMON_PASS="`openssl rand 12 -base64 2>/dev/null`"
DAEMON_ID="${SYNOPKG_PKGNAME} daemon user"
ENGINE_SCRIPT="openremote.sh"
CATALINA_PID="${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/${SYNOPKG_PKGNAME}.pid"
#'ua' prefix means wget user-agent will be customized
INSTALL_FILES="ua${DOWNLOAD_URL}"
TEMP_FOLDER="`find / -maxdepth 2 -path '/volume?/@tmp' | head -n 1`"
source /etc/profile


pre_checks ()
{
  if [ -z ${JAVA_HOME} ]; then
    echo "Java is not installed or not properly configured. JAVA_HOME is not defined. " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    echo "Download and install the Java Synology package from http://wp.me/pVshC-z5" >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    exit 1
  fi
  
  if [ ! -f ${JAVA_HOME}/bin/java ]; then
    echo "Java is not installed or not properly configured. The Java binary could not be located. " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    echo "Download and install the Java Synology package from http://wp.me/pVshC-z5" >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    exit 1
  fi
  
  #is the User Home service enabled?
  if [ "`synogetkeyvalue /etc/synoinfo.conf userHomeEnable`" == "no" ]; then
    echo "The User Home service is not enabled. Please enable this feature in the User control panel in DSM." >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    exit 1
  fi
}


preinst ()
{
  pre_checks
  cd ${TEMP_FOLDER}
  for WGET_URL in ${INSTALL_FILES}
  do
    WGET_FILENAME="`echo ${WGET_URL} | sed -r "s%^.*/(.*)%\1%"`"
    [ -f ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${WGET_FILENAME} ] && rm ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${WGET_FILENAME}
    #this will allow openremote.org to track the number of downloads from Synology users
    WGET_URL=`echo ${WGET_URL} | sed -e "s%^ua%--user-agent=Synology --referer=https://pcloadletter.co.uk/2011/10/25/openremote-package-for-synology/ %"`
    wget ${WGET_URL}
    if [ $? != 0 ]; then
      if [ -d ${PUBLIC_FOLDER} ] && [ -f ${PUBLIC_FOLDER}/${WGET_FILENAME} ]; then
        cp ${PUBLIC_FOLDER}/${WGET_FILENAME} ${TEMP_FOLDER}
      else     
        echo "There was a problem downloading ${WGET_FILENAME} from the official download link, " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
        echo "which was \"${WGET_URL}\" " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
        echo "Alternatively, you may download this file manually and place it in the 'public' shared folder. " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
        exit 1
      fi
    fi
  done
  
  exit 0
}


postinst ()
{
  #create daemon user
  synouser --add ${DAEMON_USER} ${DAEMON_PASS} "${DAEMON_ID}" 0 "" ""
  
  #extract main archive
  cd ${TEMP_FOLDER}
  #DSM 6.0 no longer includes unzip, use 7z instead
  unzip ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${DOWNLOAD_FILE} || 7z x -y ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${DOWNLOAD_FILE} > /dev/null
  rm ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${DOWNLOAD_FILE}
  mv ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${EXTRACTED_FOLDER}/* ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}
  rmdir ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${EXTRACTED_FOLDER}
  chmod +x ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/bin/${ENGINE_SCRIPT}
  
  #TCP port 8081 is in use on Synology so we need to move Catalina to another port - 18581
  #This regex was tricky, but possible thanks to http://austinmatzko.com/2008/04/26/sed-multi-line-search-and-replace/
  #sed -i -n '1h;1!H;${;g;s%\(<Connector executor="HTTP-ThreadPool".*port="\)8080\(".* />\)%\118581\2%;p;}' ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/conf/server.xml
  #sed -i "s/^webapp.port=.*$/webapp.port=18581/" ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/webapps/controller/WEB-INF/classes/config.properties

  #change owner of folder tree
  chown -R ${DAEMON_USER} ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}

  #determine the daemon user homedir and save that variable in the user's profile
  #this is needed because new users seem to inherit a HOME value of /root which they have no permissions for
  DAEMON_HOME="`cat /etc/passwd | grep "${DAEMON_ID}" | cut -f6 -d':'`"
  su - ${DAEMON_USER} -s /bin/sh -c "echo export HOME=\'${DAEMON_HOME}\' >> /var/services/homes/${DAEMON_USER}/.profile"
  su - ${DAEMON_USER} -s /bin/sh -c "echo export CATALINA_PID=\'${CATALINA_PID}\' >> /var/services/homes/${DAEMON_USER}/.profile"

  #add firewall config
  /usr/syno/bin/servicetool --install-configure-file --package /var/packages/${SYNOPKG_PKGNAME}/scripts/${SYNOPKG_PKGNAME}.sc > /dev/null
  
  exit 0
}


preuninst ()
{
  `dirname $0`/stop-start-status stop
  
  exit 0
}


postuninst ()
{
  #remove daemon user
  synouser --del ${DAEMON_USER}

  #remove firewall config
  if [ "${SYNOPKG_PKG_STATUS}" == "UNINSTALL" ]; then
    /usr/syno/bin/servicetool --remove-configure-file --package ${SYNOPKG_PKGNAME}.sc > /dev/null
  fi
  
  #remove daemon user's home directory (needed since DSM 4.1)
  [ -e /var/services/homes/${DAEMON_USER} ] && rm -r /var/services/homes/${DAEMON_USER}
  
  exit 0
}
 

start-stop-status.sh

#!/bin/sh

#--------OPENREMOTE start-stop-status script
#--------package maintained at pcloadletter.co.uk

DNAME="`dirname $0 | cut -f4 -d'/'`"
DAEMON_USER="`echo ${DNAME} | awk {'print tolower($_)'}`"
DAEMON_ID="${DNAME} daemon user"
DAEMON_HOME="`cat /etc/passwd | grep "${DAEMON_ID}" | cut -f6 -d':'`"
PKG_FOLDER="`dirname $0 | cut -f1-4 -d'/'`"
#DLOG="${PKG_FOLDER}/target/logs/catalina.out"
DLOG="${PKG_FOLDER}/target/logs/container/stderrout.log"
PID_FILE="${PKG_FOLDER}/target/${DNAME}.pid"
ENGINE_SCRIPT="openremote.sh"
TIMESTAMP="`date "+%F %X,000"`"
source /etc/profile
source /root/.profile


start_daemon ()
{
  #set the current timezone for Java so that log timestamps are accurate, modern timezone names so DST works
  SYNO_TZ=`cat /etc/synoinfo.conf | grep timezone | cut -f2 -d'"'`
  #fix for DST time in DSM 5.2 thanks to MinimServer Syno package author
  [ -e /usr/share/zoneinfo/Timezone/synotztable.json ] \
   && SYNO_TZ=`jq ".${SYNO_TZ} | .nameInTZDB" /usr/share/zoneinfo/Timezone/synotztable.json | sed -e "s/\"//g"` \
   || SYNO_TZ=`grep "^${SYNO_TZ}" /usr/share/zoneinfo/Timezone/tzname | sed -e "s/^.*= //"`
  grep "^export TZ" ${DAEMON_HOME}/.profile > /dev/null \
   && sed -i "s%^export TZ=.*$%export TZ='${SYNO_TZ}'%" ${DAEMON_HOME}/.profile \
   || echo export TZ=\'${SYNO_TZ}\' >> ${DAEMON_HOME}/.profile
  
  su - ${DAEMON_USER} -s /bin/sh -c "cd ${PKG_FOLDER}/target/bin && source ~/.profile && ./${ENGINE_SCRIPT} start"
  if [ -z ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST} ]; then
    #script was manually invoked, need this to show status change in Package Center
    [ -e ${PKG_FOLDER}/enabled ] || touch ${PKG_FOLDER}/enabled
  fi
}

stop_daemon ()
{
  kill `cat ${PID_FILE}`
  wait_for_status 1 20 || kill -9 `cat ${PID_FILE}`
  rm -f ${PID_FILE}
  if [ -z ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST} ]; then
    #script was manually invoked, need this to show status change in Package Center
    [ -e ${PKG_FOLDER}/enabled ] && rm ${PKG_FOLDER}/enabled
  fi
}

daemon_status ()
{
  if [ -f ${PID_FILE} ] && kill -0 `cat ${PID_FILE}` > /dev/null 2>&1; then
    return
  fi
  rm -f ${PID_FILE}
  return 1
}

wait_for_status ()
{
  counter=$2
  while [ ${counter} -gt 0 ]; do
    daemon_status
    [ $? -eq $1 ] && return
    let counter=counter-1
    sleep 1
  done
  return 1
}

case $1 in
  start)
    if daemon_status; then
      echo ${DNAME} is already running with PID `cat ${PID_FILE}`
      exit 0
    else
      echo Starting ${DNAME} ...
      start_daemon
      exit $?
    fi
  ;;

  stop)
    if daemon_status; then
      echo Stopping ${DNAME} ...
      stop_daemon
      exit $?
    else
      echo ${DNAME} is not running
      exit 0
    fi
  ;;

  restart)
    stop_daemon
    start_daemon
    exit $?
  ;;

  status)
    if daemon_status; then
      echo ${DNAME} is running with PID `cat ${PID_FILE}`
      exit 0
    else
      echo ${DNAME} is not running
      exit 1
    fi
  ;;

  log)
    echo "${DLOG}"
    exit 0
  ;;

  *)
    echo "Usage: $0 {start|stop|status|restart}" >&2
    exit 1
  ;;

esac
 

Changelog:

  • 2.6.2-0010 25 Jul 2016 – Substantial re-brand and overhaul for DSM 6.0, updated to OpenRemote Controller 2.6.2 beta which adds Java 8 compatibility, Controller is now the Pro version which is free for personal non-commercial use – registration for an OpenRemote Designer account is required, added many enhancements developed for other packages
  • 2.1.1-0009 May 2016 – Abandoned test, never published
  • 2.0.1-0008 23 Jan 2013 – Changes not recorded
  • 2.0.1-0007 20 Jan 2013 – Fixes for DSM 4.2
  • 2.0.1-006 24 Nov 2012 – Updated to release 2.0.1, merged the package scripts for easier maintenance
  • 2.0.0-005 12 Mar 2012 – Updated to release 2.0 with Web Console, package now downloads installation files directly from openremote.org, removed Java 6 check, timezone support for Java, icons vanish from DSM menu when package in stopped state, added URL for Web Console to Package Info in Package Center
  • 2.0.0_20110611-004 18 Nov 2011 – Fixed missing panel.xml error due to relative path problem in openremote.sh, documented on OpenRemote forum
  • 2.0.0_20110611-003 18 Nov 2011 – Fixed controller TCP port after autodiscover from panel
  • 2.0.0_20110611-002 17 Nov 2011 – Updated for package repo to allow update notification, made Java 6 mandatory and added link to user forum in More Info
  • 2.0.0_SNAPSHOT_20110611 25 Oct 2011 – v1 initial spk release
 
 

Compiling nano with UTF-8 support for Synology

The version of nano in Optware doesn’t have UTF-8 support for some reason. This took me ages to get working – hopefully it’ll help someone else.
I have made a compiled binary for Marvell Kirkwood CPU available here.

These are the steps taken to compile your own from source (you will need to have bootstrapped your NAS and have the development tools installed):

#-----compile ncurses static library - neither DSM nor ipkg provide headers
cd /volume1/@tmp
wget http://ftp.gnu.org/pub/gnu/ncurses/ncurses-5.9.tar.gz
tar xvfz ncurses-5.9.tar.gz
cd ncurses-5.9
./configure --prefix=/opt --enable-widec
make
mkdir /tmp/lib
cp lib/libncursesw.a /tmp/lib
cd ..
#-----compile nano
wget http://www.nano-editor.org/dist/v2.2/nano-2.2.6.tar.gz
tar xvfz nano-2.2.6.tar.gz
cd nano-2.2.6
./configure --prefix=/opt --includedir=/volume1/@tmp/ncurses-5.9/include --libdir=/tmp/lib --enable-utf8 --disable-nls --enable-color --enable-extra --enable-multibuffer --enable-nanorc
sed -i -e 's/^CPPFLAGS = -I\/usr\/include\/ncursesw/CPPFLAGS = -I\/volume1\/@tmp\/ncurses-5.9\/include -L\/tmp\/lib/' Makefile
sed -i -e 's/^CPPFLAGS = -I\/usr\/include\/ncursesw/CPPFLAGS = -I\/volume1\/@tmp\/ncurses-5.9\/include -L\/tmp\/lib/' src/Makefile
sed -i -e 's/^LDFLAGS.*$/LDFLAGS = -L\/tmp\/lib/' Makefile
sed -i -e 's/^LDFLAGS.*$/LDFLAGS = -L\/tmp\/lib/' src/Makefile
make
make install

Cross-compiling FFmpeg with librtmp for Intel CPU Synology NAS

I used this method to compile the FFmpeg binary for inclusion in my Serviio package, because I don’t have a NAS with an Intel CPU. Several people who tried to help were getting strange errors while trying to compile on their NAS units.

To begin, install 64bit Ubuntu Linux (I used a VM). As a test I first successfully cross-compiled ARM binaries using the same method but using the ARM Synology toolchain, since I was able to test the results. Once I got it working I did the following:

#-----set up Synology toolchain
cd ~/Downloads
wget http://sourceforge.net/projects/dsgpl/files/DSM%203.1%20Tool%20Chains/Intel%20x86%20Linux%202.6.32/gcc420_glibc236_pineview.tgz
tar xvfz gcc420_glibc236_pineview.tgz
sudo mv i686-linux-gnu /usr/local
sudo mv x86_64-linux-gnu /usr/local
#-----I think the Synology toolchain is anticipating being run on i686-linux-gnu, so we need 32bit libraries to even run the binaries
#-----http://maketecheasier.com/run-32-bit-apps-in-64-bit-linux/2009/08/10
sudo apt-get install ia32-libs
export PATH="/usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu/bin:${PATH}"

#-----libz static lib
wget http://zlib.net/zlib-1.2.5.tar.gz
tar xvfz zlib-1.2.5.tar.gz
cd zlib-1.2.5
#-----http://www.crosscompile.org/static/pages/ZLib.html
#-----http://tinc-vpn.org/examples/cross-compiling-64-bit-windows-binary/
./configure --prefix=/usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu --static
sed -i 's/^CC=gcc/CC=x86_64-linux-gnu-gcc/g' Makefile
sed -i 's/^LDSHARED=gcc/LDSHARED=x86_64-linux-gnu-gcc/g' Makefile
sed -i 's/^CPP=gcc -E/CPP=x86_64-linux-gnu-gcc -E/g' Makefile
sed -i 's/^AR=ar rc/AR=x86_64-linux-gnu-ar rc/g' Makefile
sed -i 's/^RANLIB=ranlib/RANLIB=x86_64-linux-gnu-ranlib/g' Makefile
make libz.a
cp libz.a /usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu/lib
cp *.h /usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu/include/
cd ..

#-----libbz2 static lib
wget http://bzip.org/1.0.6/bzip2-1.0.6.tar.gz
tar xvfz bzip2-1.0.6.tar.gz
cd bzip2-1.0.6
sed -i 's/^CC=gcc/CC=x86_64-linux-gnu-gcc/g' Makefile
sed -i 's/^AR=ar rc/AR=x86_64-linux-gnu-ar rc/g' Makefile
sed -i 's/^RANLIB=ranlib/RANLIB=x86_64-linux-gnu-ranlib/g' Makefile
make
make install PREFIX=/usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu
cd ..

#-----libmp3lame static lib
wget http://sourceforge.net/projects/lame/files/lame/3.98.4/lame-3.98.4.tar.gz
tar xvfz lame-3.98.4.tar.gz
cd lame-3.98.4
./configure --prefix=/usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu --host=x86_64-linux-gnu --target=x86_64-linux-gnu --build=x86_64-linux-gnu --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-decoder --enable-nasm
make
make install

#-----libssl & libcrypto static libs
ipkg install openssl-dev
wget http://www.openssl.org/source/openssl-0.9.8p.tar.gz
tar xvfz openssl-0.9.8p.tar.gz
cd openssl-0.9.8p
./config --prefix=/usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu no-shared
sed -i 's/^CC= gcc/CC= x86_64-linux-gnu-gcc/g' Makefile
sed -i 's/^AR= ar /AR= x86_64-linux-gnu-ar /g' Makefile
sed -i 's/^ARD=ar /ARD=x86_64-linux-gnu-ar /g' Makefile
sed -i 's/^RANLIB= \/usr\/bin\/ranlib/RANLIB=x86_64-linux-gnu-ranlib/g' Makefile
sed -i 's/^MAKEDEPPROG= gcc/MAKEDEPPROG= x86_64-linux-gnu-gcc /g' Makefile
make
make install
cd ..

#-----librtmp 2.4 static lib
wget http://download.serviio.org/opensource/rtmpdump-c58cfb3e9208c6e6bc1aa18f1b1d650d799084e5.tar.gz
tar xvfz rtmpdump-c58cfb3e9208c6e6bc1aa18f1b1d650d799084e5.tar.gz
cd rtmpdump
#-----move all static libs to a separate folder to force compiler to use them
#-----http://www.gossamer-threads.com/lists/apache/dev/265052
mkdir /tmp/lib
cp /usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu/lib/*.a /tmp/lib
#-----fix Makefile (won't compile without libdl linked)
#-----http://forum.luahub.com/index.php?topic=2390.0
sed -i.bak -e '/^LIB_OPENSSL\=/s/lcrypto/lcrypto \-ldl/' Makefile
make CROSS_COMPILE=x86_64-linux-gnu- SYS=posix prefix=/usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu INC=-I/usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu XLDFLAGS=-L/tmp/lib SHARED=
make install prefix=/usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu SHARED=
cd ..
#-----gather all static libs again ready for FFmpeg compile
cp /usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu/lib/*.a /tmp/lib
#-----remove unsupported URL line from pkgconfig/librtmp.pc
#-----pkg-config --exists --print-errors librtmp
sed -i -e '/^URL/d' /usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu/lib/pkgconfig/librtmp.pc
export PKG_CONFIG_PATH="${PKG_CONFIG_PATH}:/usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu/lib/pkgconfig"

#-----FFmpeg 0.8.2 (slightly newer than the one at Serviio.org)
wget http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1188556/ffmpeg-HEAD-05a2673.tar.gz
tar xvfz ffmpeg-HEAD-05a2673.tar.gz
cd ffmpeg-HEAD-05a2673
#-----Intel CPU-specific options
#-----pkg-config needs to be defined because with cross-prefix it assumes x86_64-linux-gnu-pkg-config which doesn't exist, and then librtmp won't be detected
sudo apt-get install yasm
./configure --arch=x86_64 --enable-ssse3 --cross-prefix=x86_64-linux-gnu- --target-os=linux --prefix=/usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu
--extra-cflags='-I/usr/local/x86_64-linux-gnu/include' --extra-ldflags='-L/tmp/lib' --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-ffplay
--disable-ffserver --enable-pthreads --enable-libmp3lame --enable-librtmp --pkg-config=pkg-config --extra-version=Serviio
make
make install
 

Serviio 0.6 package for Synology NAS with Web UI

Serviio-package-with-webUI

The Serviio Web UI, styled to look like the regular DSM control panel widgets

 

UPDATE – This is no longer the most recent package. I have released a new version and created a new blog post to keep the comments on topic.

My guide for installing Petr Nejedly’s excellent Serviio 0.5.2 on Synology has been a very popular post, and many people have got it running. However, the process is still complex enough to deter a lot of people and, as I learned more about my Synology NAS, I realised that I could automate the whole thing. The biggest obstacle was creating a package for Java, but adding locale support to the syno Linux also proved difficult.

The PHP Web UI is now included which you can use to manage Serviio once it’s installed. I have tried to fix most of the localization issues with it, and have edited the CSS to give it the look and feel of DSM as much as I could. You could also use Serviio Remote Console from another computer if you prefer. Any online content plugins (ending in .groovy) that are found in your NAS ‘public’ share will also be installed into Serviio’s plugins folder automatically during installation.

The package will allow future upgrades while preserving the media database and the online plugins, as long as Serviio itself is ok with that. You can see Serviio’s log by clicking More in the Package Centre. DSM Package Center installs the application to /volume1/@appstore/Serviio though from what I understand, on multi-volume systems the user is prompted for a destination volume. If you need to edit device profiles, add online content plugins, or look at the log in detail that’s where you’ll find the files. Bear in mind that a NAS, even an Intel Atom powered one, is unlikely to have sufficient CPU power to manage realtime video transcoding (e.g. from DivX to MPEG2), though it will manage remuxing MKV to M2TS and realtime audio transcoding.

 

Download

If you have DSM 3.2, you can install directly from Package Center. In Settings -> Package Sources add my package repository URL which is http://packages.pcloadletter.co.uk

If you’re still on DSM 3.1, download one of the following packages. Right-click, Save As:

Serviio uses some open source libraries without which it would not have been possible.
By downloading the software on this page you are agreeing to the terms of the original Serviio End User Licence Agreement.
I accept no liability for any damage that may occur to your data or your cat’s health as a result of using this software :) The scripts are shown in full below, so you are free to assess any risks yourself.

 

Instructions

This package can be installed on an unmodified NAS – no hacking is required. It has been tested on DSM 3.1 and DSM 3.2. Here’s what you need to do:

  • In the DSM User control panel enable the User Home service
  • In the DSM Web Services control panel enable Web Station
  • Using the DSM Package Center install my Java SE for Embedded Synology package
  • Download any online content plugins that you require and leave the .groovy file for each in your NAS’s public shared folder
  • Determine your NAS’s CPU type, and install the appropriate Serviio Synology package from the download link above
  • Give it some time to start (click More Info in Package Center to see the Log tab – check it has loaded all the renderer profiles), then you can use the Serviio icon in the DSM drop down menu in the top-right to launch the Web UI. This Serviio icon will only be visible to admin users in DSM
  • To use the Serviio Remote Console from a Windows PC edit ServiioConsole.exe.vmoptions in the Serviio folder and add the line: -Dserviio.remoteHost=192.168.x.x (replace with your NAS’s IP address). It can take a minute or so to start – this is normal. For details on how to configure the Remote Console on other operating systems refer to the Serviio FAQ. It seems that the first time Serviio starts with a blank database the Remote Console will get stuck showing the message “Serviio is updating its Media Library”. If that happens wait a couple of minutes, stop and restart Serviio via the Package Center. Give it another couple of minutes then the remote console should work fine.
  • Once the console is up, disable ‘Generate thumbnails for local videos’, and set the ‘Transcoded files location’ to /volume1/@tmp. Don’t forget to use the Users control panel in DSM to grant permission for the Serviio user to read your files (if they’re not in the public share)
  • When you add folders to your library you need to use the ‘Add path…’ button (not ‘Add local…’) and give the full Linux path (e.g. /volume1/share-name/Movies). There are issues with the Add Local ajax file browser which mean that it doesn’t work properly even if you give PHP access to the filesystem root
 

The DSM main drop-down menu, showing the Serviio Web UI icon

 

Upgrading from 0.5.2

If you want to upgrade from a manually installed 0.5.2, you will need to follow the steps below. I was considering automating it, but it gets complicated trying to remove people’s edits from /etc/profile which may not be entirely consistent.

  • Stop the Serviio 0.5.2 daemon by running: /opt/etc/init.d/S99serviio.sh stop
  • Copy your media database somewhere safe: cp -R /opt/serviio/library/db /volume1/public
  • Follow the uninstallation steps at the bottom of my original guide
  • Install my Java Synology package
  • Install the Serviio Synology package from the download link above but don’t start it yet
  • Copy your saved database into position: cp -R /volume1/public/db /volume1/@appstore/Serviio/library (warning – for people with multiple volumes, the @appstore folder is not always on /volume1 apparently)
  • Force ownership on database files: chown -R serviio /volume1/@appstore/Serviio/library
  • Force ownership on transcode cache: chown -R serviio /volume1/@tmp/Serviio
  • Start Serviio in the DSM Package Center
  • Follow the rest of the settings guidelines from above
 

Package scripts

For info, here are the scripts inside the package. The security-conscious among you can untar the package and take a look at the contents for yourself.

preinst

#!/bin/sh

#--------SERVIIO preinstall script
#--------package maintained at pcloadletter.co.uk

source /etc/profile

if [ -z ${JAVA_HOME} ]; then
        echo "Java is not installed or not properly configured. JAVA_HOME is not defined. " > $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
        echo "Download and install the Java Synology package from http://wp.me/pVshC-z5" >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
        exit 1
fi

if [ ! -f ${JAVA_HOME}/bin/java ]; then
        echo "Java is not installed or not properly configured. The Java binary could not be located. " > $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
        echo "Download and install the Java Synology package from http://wp.me/pVshC-z5" >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
        exit 1
fi

exit 0
 

postinst

#!/bin/sh

#--------SERVIIO postinstall script
#--------package maintained at pcloadletter.co.uk

#create serviio daemon user
synouser --add serviio `${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/bin/passgen 1 20` "Serviio daemon user" 0 "" ""

#determine the serviio user homedir and save that variable in the user's profile
#this is needed because librtmp needs to write a file called ~/.swfinfo
#and new users seem to inherit a HOME value of /root which they have no permissions for
SERVIIO_HOMEDIR=`cat /etc/passwd | sed -r '/Serviio daemon user/!d;s/^.*:Serviio daemon user:(.*):.*$/\1/'`
su - serviio -s /bin/sh -c "echo export HOME=${SERVIIO_HOMEDIR} >> .profile"

#change owner of Serviio folder tree
chown -R serviio ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}

#reset ownership on any pre-existing transcoding temp folder (same volume as appstore)
if [ -d ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../../@tmp/Serviio ]; then
        chown -R serviio ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../../@tmp/Serviio
fi
#reset ownership on any pre-existing transcoding temp folder (on volume1 in case app was installed on a different volume)
if [ -d /volume1/@tmp/Serviio ]; then
        chown -R serviio /volume1/@tmp/Serviio
fi

#create symbolic link to Serviio's version of FFmpeg
if [ -f /opt/bin/ffmpeg ]; then
        mv /opt/bin/ffmpeg /opt/bin/ffmpeg.bak.serviio
        ln -s ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/bin/ffmpeg /opt/bin/ffmpeg
else
        ln -s ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/bin/ffmpeg /bin/ffmpeg
fi

#set up symlink for the DSM GUI
if [ -d /usr/syno/synoman/webman/3rdparty ]; then
        ln -s ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/DSM /usr/syno/synoman/webman/3rdparty/Serviio
fi

#move web UI files to Webstation root folder
mv ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/web /volume1/web/serviio

#find path of public share (it might not be on /volume1)
PLUGIN_PICKUP=`cat /usr/syno/etc/smb.conf | sed -r '/\/public$/!d;s/^.*path=(\/volume[0-9]{1,3}\/public).*$/\1/'`

#pick up any plugins from the public share
mv ${PLUGIN_PICKUP}/*.groovy ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/plugins

exit 0
 

start-stop-status

#!/bin/sh

#--------SERVIIO start-stop-status script
#--------package maintained at pcloadletter.co.uk

daemon_status ()
{
        ps | grep '^ *[0-9]* serviio' > /dev/null
}

case $1 in
        start)
                #start Serviio in background mode
                su - serviio -s /bin/sh -c "${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/bin/serviio.sh &"
                exit 0

        ;;
        stop)
                su - serviio -s /bin/sh -c "${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/bin/serviio.sh -stop"
                exit 0
        ;;
        status)
                if daemon_status ; then
                        exit 0
                else
                        exit 1
                fi
        ;;
        log)
        echo "${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/log/serviio.log"
                exit 0
        ;;
esac
 

preuninst

#!/bin/sh

#--------SERVIIO preuninstall script
#--------package maintained at pcloadletter.co.uk

#make sure that Serviio is stopped
${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/bin/serviio.sh -stop
sleep 6

exit 0
 

postuninst

#!/bin/sh

#--------SERVIIO postuninstall script
#--------package maintained at pcloadletter.co.uk

#remove serviio daemon user
synouser --del serviio

#remove symlink and reinstate any backed up version of FFmpeg
if [ -L /opt/bin/ffmpeg ] && [ -f /opt/bin/ffmpeg.bak.serviio ]; then
        rm /opt/bin/ffmpeg
        mv /opt/bin/ffmpeg.bak.serviio /opt/bin/ffmpeg
fi
if [ -L /bin/ffmpeg ]; then
        rm /bin/ffmpeg
fi

#remove DSM icon symlink
rm /usr/syno/synoman/webman/3rdparty/Serviio

#remove web UI
if [ -d /volume1/web/serviio ]; then
        rm -r /volume1/web/serviio
fi

exit 0
 

preupgrade

#!/bin/sh

#--------SERVIIO preupgrade script
#--------package maintained at pcloadletter.co.uk

#make sure that Serviio is stopped
${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/bin/serviio.sh -stop
sleep 6

#if a media database exists we need to preserve it
if [ -d ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/library/db ]; then
        mkdir ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../serviio_db_migration
        mv ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/library/db ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../serviio_db_migration
fi

#if online plugins exist we need to migrate them
if ls ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/plugins/*.groovy; then
        mkdir ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../serviio_plugin_migration
        mv ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/plugins ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../serviio_plugin_migration
fi

exit 0
 

postupgrade

#!/bin/sh

#--------SERVIIO postupgrade script
#--------package maintained at pcloadletter.co.uk

#use the backed up media database from the previous version
if [ -d ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../serviio_db_migration/db ]; then
        mv ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../serviio_db_migration/db ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/library
        rmdir ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../serviio_db_migration

        #serviio daemon user has been deleted and recreated so we need to reset ownership (new UID)
        chown -R serviio ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/library/db
fi

#use the backed up plugins from the previous version
if [ -d ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../serviio_plugin_migration/plugins ]; then
        cp ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../serviio_plugin_migration/plugins/*.groovy ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/plugins
        if [ ! -z ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST} ]; then
                if [ -d ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../serviio_plugin_migration ]; then
                        rm -r ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../serviio_plugin_migration
                fi
        fi
        #serviio daemon user has been deleted and recreated so we need to reset ownership (new UID)
        chown -R serviio ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/plugins
fi

#reset ownership on transcoding temp folder (same volume as appstore)
if [ -d ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../../@tmp/Serviio ]; then
        chown -R serviio ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/../../@tmp/Serviio
fi
#reset ownership on transcoding temp folder (on volume1 in case app was installed on a different volume)
if [ -d /volume1/@tmp/Serviio ]; then
        chown -R serviio /volume1/@tmp/Serviio
fi

#restart Web Station to clear webserver caches
if [ -f /usr/syno/etc/rc.d/S97apache-user.sh ]; then
        /usr/syno/etc/rc.d/S97apache-user.sh restart
fi

exit 0
 

Changelog:

  • 0.6.0.1-005 added Web Station dependency, EULA dialog, and links for Web UI and user forum in More Info
  • 0.6.0.1-004 test for package repo to allow update notification
  • 0.6.0.1 v3 hopefully fixed an issue with the Serviio DSM icon in DSM 3.2 on NAS units without Optware installed
  • 0.6.0.1 v2 inclusion of a modified version of the PHP Web UI
  • 0.6.0.1 v1 new minor Serviio release with some updated international translations – will upgrade 0.6 preserving the media library
  • 0.6 v1 first public release
  • 0.6b4 v2 fixed permissions on transcode temporary folder following upgrade, avoiding the need for a reboot
  • 0.6b4 v1 added upgrade scripts to allow media database migration (install future packages over the top of this one – database is preserved)
  • 0.6b3c v2 fixed HOME env var for serviio user (to fix librtmp issues with BBC iPlayer) and removed the need to edit the passwd file to change the shell (safer)
  • 0.6b3c v1 initial spk test release

 
 

Java SE Embedded package for Synology NAS

There is a lot of good Java software, but it’s difficult to get Java running on a NAS. I decided to do something about that, mainly to pave the way for a Serviio package that didn’t require a huge guide to install. In compliance with the Oracle EULA the Java binaries cannot be redistributed, so this package looks for the downloaded .tar.gz archive in the public shared folder on the NAS. The end user is required to register with Oracle to get the file, as you can see from the description below. I also added locale support to the underlying Linux since Java requires this for UTF-8 support when reading from the filesystem (DSM 4.3 later included this). Timezone support is also configured.

This package installs Java SE Embedded which is purposefully designed to run on low specification headless hardware. It should be noted that Synology Java Manager (only available on Intel products) is the full Java Runtime Environment, and consequently uses more RAM. By default you should use Java 8, unless the application you want to run specifically requires Java 7.

Please note that Oracle ceased maintaining Java 6 in 2012, so it should be considered a serious security vulnerability. The Java 6 package has been withdrawn from the package repository for this reason. If you need it to run a particular piece of software you may download it here for manual installation. Please also note that Oracle retired support for PowerPC CPUs following Java 8 Update 6, so the PowerPC package remains at that version.

Java Package

 

Instructions

  • In Synology DSM’s Package Center, click Settings and add my package repository:
    Add Package Repository
  • The repository will push its certificate automatically to the NAS, which is used to validate package integrity. Set the Trust Level to Synology Inc. and trusted publishers:
    Trust Level
  • Now browse the Community section in Package Center to install a Java SE Embedded package:
    Community-packages
    The repository only displays packages which are compatible with your specific model of NAS. If you don’t see Java Embedded in the list, then either your NAS model or your DSM version are not supported at this time.
  • If you have a multi-bay NAS, use the Shared Folder control panel to create a shared folder called public (it must be all lower case). On single bay models this is created by default. Assign it with Read/Write privileges for everyone.
  • Register with Oracle and download the appropriate version of Java SE Embedded for your CPU architecture and save in the public shared folder on your NAS. Note that to get any version of Java older than the current one you will need to follow the Oracle Java SE Embedded Downloads Archive link on that page. If in doubt, attempt to install the package first, and the error message will tell you which specific download version is required.
  • If you have trouble getting the Java archive recognised, try downloading it with a different web browser. Some browsers try to help by uncompressing the file, or renaming it without warning. I have tried to code around most of these behaviours. Use Firefox if all else fails.
 

Package scripts

For information, here are the package scripts so you can see what it’s going to do. You can get more information about how packages work by reading the Synology 3rd Party Developer Guide.

installer.sh

#!/bin/sh

#--------JAVA installer script
#--------package maintained at pcloadletter.co.uk

COMMENT="# Synology Java Package"
SYNO_CPU_ARCH="`uname -m`"
[ "`echo ${SYNO_CPU_ARCH} | cut -c1-7`" == "armv5te" ] && SYNO_CPU_ARCH="armv5tel"
#--------Synology switched Armada 370 systems from SoftFP to HardFP EABI for DSM 6.0
[ "${SYNOPKG_DSM_ARCH}" == "armada370" ] && [ ${SYNOPKG_DSM_VERSION_MAJOR} -gt 5 ] && SYNO_CPU_ARCH="armv7l-hflt"
[ "${SYNOPKG_DSM_ARCH}" == "armada375" ] && SYNO_CPU_ARCH="armv7l-hflt"
[ "${SYNOPKG_DSM_ARCH}" == "armada38x" ] && SYNO_CPU_ARCH="armv7l-hflt"
[ "${SYNOPKG_DSM_ARCH}" == "comcerto2k" ] && SYNO_CPU_ARCH="armv7l-hflt"
[ "${SYNOPKG_DSM_ARCH}" == "alpine" ] && SYNO_CPU_ARCH="armv7l-hflt"
[ "${SYNOPKG_DSM_ARCH}" == "alpine4k" ] && SYNO_CPU_ARCH="armv7l-hflt"
[ "${SYNOPKG_DSM_ARCH}" == "monaco" ] && SYNO_CPU_ARCH="armv7l-hflt"
[ "${SYNOPKG_DSM_ARCH}" == "x86_64" ] && [ "${WIZARD_JRE_EE}" == "true" ] && SYNO_CPU_ARCH="i686"
[ "${SYNOPKG_DSM_ARCH}" == "x86_64" ] && [ ${SYNOPKG_DSM_VERSION_MAJOR} -lt 6 ] && SYNO_CPU_ARCH="i686"

if [ "${SYNOPKG_PKGNAME}" == "java6" ]; then
  DOWNLOAD_URL="http://tinyurl.com/javaembedarchive"
  EXTRACTED_FOLDER="ejre1.6.0_38"
  JCE_BINARY="jce_policy-6.zip"
  JCE_URL="http://tinyurl.com/java-jce6"
  JCE_FOLDER="jce"
  if [ "`echo ${SYNO_CPU_ARCH} | cut -c1-7`" == "armv5te" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejre-1_6_0_38-fcs-b05-linux-arm-sflt-eabi-headless-13_nov_2012.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="ARMv5 Linux - Headless EABI"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "armv7l" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejre-1_6_0_38-fcs-b05-linux-arm-vfp-eabi-headless-13_nov_2012.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="ARMv6/7 Linux - Headless EABI, VFP, SoftFP ABI, Little Endian"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "i686" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejre-1_6_0_38-fcs-b05-linux-i586-headless-13_nov_2012.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="x86 Linux Small Footprint - Headless"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "x86_64" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejre-1_6_0_38-fcs-b05-linux-i586-headless-13_nov_2012.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="x86 Linux Small Footprint - Headless"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "ppc" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejre-1_6_0_38-fcs-b05-linux-ppc-e500v2-headless-13_nov_2012.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="Power Architecture Linux - Headless - e500v2 core"
  fi    

elif [ "${SYNOPKG_PKGNAME}" == "java7" ]; then
  DOWNLOAD_URL="http://tinyurl.com/javaembed"
  EXTRACTED_FOLDER="ejre1.7.0_75"
  JCE_BINARY="UnlimitedJCEPolicyJDK7.zip"
  JCE_URL="http://tinyurl.com/java-jce7"
  JCE_FOLDER="UnlimitedJCEPolicy"
  if [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "armv5tel" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejre-7u75-fcs-b13-linux-arm-sflt-headless-18_dec_2014.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="ARMv5 Linux - Headless EABI, SoftFP ABI, Little Endian"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "armv7l" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejre-7u75-fcs-b13-linux-arm-vfp-sflt-client_headless-18_dec_2014.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="ARMv6/7 Linux - Headless - Client Compiler EABI, VFP, SoftFP ABI, Little Endian"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "armv7l-hflt" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejre-7u75-fcs-b13-linux-arm-vfp-hflt-client_headless-18_dec_2014.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="ARMv6/7 Linux - Headless - Client Compiler EABI, VFP, HardFP ABI, Little Endian"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "i686" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejre-7u75-fcs-b13-linux-i586-headless-18_dec_2014.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="x86 Linux Small Footprint - Headless"  
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "x86_64" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejre-7u75-fcs-b13-linux-i586-headless-18_dec_2014.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="x86 Linux Small Footprint - Headless"  
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "ppc" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejre-7u75-fcs-b13-linux-ppc-e500v2-headless-18_dec_2014.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="Power Architecture Linux - Headless - e500v2 with double-precision SPE Floating Point Unit"
  fi

elif [ "${SYNOPKG_PKGNAME}" == "java8" ]; then
  DOWNLOAD_URL="http://tinyurl.com/javaembed"
  EXTRACTED_FOLDER="ejdk1.8.0_211"
  JCE_BINARY="jce_policy-8.zip"
  JCE_URL="http://tinyurl.com/java-jce8"
  JCE_FOLDER="UnlimitedJCEPolicyJDK8"
  if [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "armv5tel" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejdk-8u211-linux-arm-sflt.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="ARMv5/ARMv6/ARMv7 Linux - SoftFP ABI, Little Endian 2"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "armv7l" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejdk-8u211-linux-arm-sflt.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="ARMv5/ARMv6/ARMv7 Linux - SoftFP ABI, Little Endian 2"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "armv7l-hflt" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejdk-8u211-linux-armv6-vfp-hflt.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="ARMv6/ARMv7 Linux - VFP, HardFP ABI, Little Endian 1"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "aarch64" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="jdk-8u211-linux-arm64-vfp-hflt.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="Linux ARM 64 Hard Float ABI"
    DOWNLOAD_URL="http://tinyurl.com/java8arm64"
    EXTRACTED_FOLDER="jdk1.8.0_211"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "i686" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="ejdk-8u211-linux-i586.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="x86 Linux Small Footprint - Headless"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "x86_64" ]; then
    JAVA_BINARY="jre-8u211-linux-x64.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="Linux x64"
    EXTRACTED_FOLDER="jre1.8.0_211"
    DOWNLOAD_URL="http://tinyurl.com/java8x64"
  elif [ "${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}" == "ppc" ]; then
    #Oracle have discontinued Java 8 for PowerPC after update 6
    JAVA_BINARY="ejdk-8u6-fcs-b23-linux-ppc-e500v2-12_jun_2014.tar.gz"
    JAVA_BUILD="Power Architecture Linux - Headless - e500v2 with double-precision SPE Floating Point Unit"
    EXTRACTED_FOLDER="ejdk1.8.0_06"
  fi
fi

JAVA_BINARY=`echo ${JAVA_BINARY} | cut -f1 -d'.'`
PUBLIC_FOLDER="`synoshare --get public | sed -r "/Path/!d;s/^.*\[(.*)\].*$/\1/"`"
TEMP_FOLDER="`find / -maxdepth 2 -path '/volume?/@tmp' | head -n 1`"
NATIVE_BINS_URL="http://packages.pcloadletter.co.uk/downloads/java-native-${SYNO_CPU_ARCH}.tar.xz"
NATIVE_BINS_FILE="`echo ${NATIVE_BINS_URL} | sed -r "s%^.*/(.*)%\1%"`"
#DSM versions older than 4.3 need locale support adding, don't download unless needed
[ ! -e /usr/bin/locale ] && INSTALL_FILES="${NATIVE_BINS_URL}"
source /etc/profile


preinst ()
{
  synoshare -get public > /dev/null || (
    echo "A shared folder called 'public' could not be found - note this name is case-sensitive. " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    echo "Please create this using the Shared Folder DSM Control Panel and try again." >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    exit 1
  )

  JAVA_BINARY_FOUND=

  if [ -n "${JAVA_HOME}" ]; then
    echo "It seems from /etc/profile that a Java Runtime is already installed at ${JAVA_HOME}. Uninstall it and try again." >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    exit 1
  fi
  
  [ -f ${PUBLIC_FOLDER}/${JAVA_BINARY}.tar.gz ] && JAVA_BINARY_FOUND=true
  [ -f ${PUBLIC_FOLDER}/${JAVA_BINARY}.tar ] && JAVA_BINARY_FOUND=true
  [ -f ${PUBLIC_FOLDER}/${JAVA_BINARY}.tar.tar ] && JAVA_BINARY_FOUND=true
  [ -f ${PUBLIC_FOLDER}/${JAVA_BINARY}.gz ] && JAVA_BINARY_FOUND=true
  
  if [ -z ${JAVA_BINARY_FOUND} ]; then
    echo "Java binary bundle not found. " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    echo "I was expecting the file ${PUBLIC_FOLDER}/${JAVA_BINARY}.tar.gz. " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    echo "Please agree to the Oracle licence at ${DOWNLOAD_URL}, then download the '${JAVA_BUILD}' package" >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    echo "and place it in the 'public' shared folder on your NAS. This download cannot be automated even if " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    echo "displaying a package EULA could potentially cover the legal aspect, because files hosted on Oracle's " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    echo "server are protected by a session cookie requiring a JavaScript enabled browser." >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
    exit 1
  fi

  if [ "${WIZARD_JCE_UL}" == "true" ]; then
    if [ ! -f ${PUBLIC_FOLDER}/${JCE_BINARY} ]; then
      echo "JCE Unlimited Strength binary bundle not found. " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
      echo "I was expecting the file ${PUBLIC_FOLDER}/${JCE_BINARY} " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
      echo "Please agree to the Oracle licence at ${JCE_URL}, then download the Unlimited Strength Jurisdiction Policy Files zip file " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
      echo "and place it in the 'public' shared folder on your NAS. " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
      exit 1
    fi    
  fi    

  cd ${TEMP_FOLDER}
  for WGET_URL in ${INSTALL_FILES}
  do
    WGET_FILENAME="`echo ${WGET_URL} | sed -r "s%^.*/(.*)%\1%"`"
    [ -f ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${WGET_FILENAME} ] && rm ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${WGET_FILENAME}
    wget ${WGET_URL}
    if [[ $? != 0 ]]; then
      if [ -d ${PUBLIC_FOLDER} ] && [ -f ${PUBLIC_FOLDER}/${WGET_FILENAME} ]; then
        cp ${PUBLIC_FOLDER}/${WGET_FILENAME} ${TEMP_FOLDER}
      else     
        echo "There was a problem downloading ${WGET_FILENAME} from the official download link, " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
        echo "which was \"${WGET_URL}\" " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
        echo "Alternatively, you may download this file manually and place it in the 'public' shared folder. " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
        exit 1
      fi
    fi
  done
  
  exit 0
}


postinst ()
{
  WORKING_DIR=`pwd`
  
  #ldd tool is very useful but not included in DSM
  if [ ! -e /usr/local/bin/ldd ]; then
    mkdir -p /usr/local/bin
    cp ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/tools/ldd-${SYNO_CPU_ARCH} /usr/local/bin/ldd
  fi

  #extract native binaries if needed
  if [ -e ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${NATIVE_BINS_FILE} ]; then
    cd ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}
    #older DSM tar uses different command line switch for xz archives
    tar xJf ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${NATIVE_BINS_FILE} || tar xaf ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${NATIVE_BINS_FILE}
    rm ${TEMP_FOLDER}/${NATIVE_BINS_FILE}
  fi

  #extract Java (Web browsers love to interfere with .tar.gz files)
  cd ${PUBLIC_FOLDER}
  if [ -f ${JAVA_BINARY}.tar.gz ]; then
    #Firefox seems to be the only browser that leaves it alone
    tar xzf ${JAVA_BINARY}.tar.gz
  elif [ -f ${JAVA_BINARY}.gz ]; then
    #Chrome
    tar xzf ${JAVA_BINARY}.gz
  elif [ -f ${JAVA_BINARY}.tar ]; then
    #Safari
    tar xf ${JAVA_BINARY}.tar
  elif [ -f ${JAVA_BINARY}.tar.tar ]; then
    #Internet Explorer
    tar xzf ${JAVA_BINARY}.tar.tar
  fi

  #install Java
  if [ "${EXTRACTED_FOLDER}" != "${EXTRACTED_FOLDER/jdk/}" ]; then
    mv ${EXTRACTED_FOLDER} ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}
    JRE_PATH="`find ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/${EXTRACTED_FOLDER} -name jre`"
  else
    mv ${EXTRACTED_FOLDER} ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/jre
    JRE_PATH="${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/jre"
  fi

  #install unlimited crypto policy files if requested
  if [ "${WIZARD_JCE_UL}" == "true" ]; then
    if [ -e /usr/bin/7z ]; then
      7z x ${JCE_BINARY} > /dev/null 2>&1
    else
      unzip ${JCE_BINARY} 
    fi
    mv ${JCE_FOLDER}/* ${JRE_PATH}/lib/security
    rmdir ${JCE_FOLDER}
  fi  

  #change owner of folder tree
  chown -R root:root ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}

  echo "NOTE - This package does *not* start and stop like other packages. " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
  echo "Java is correctly installed if you can see the runtime and HotSpot version numbers, " >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
  echo "and locale information in the package Log tab." >> $SYNOPKG_TEMP_LOGFILE
  
  exit 0
}


preuninst ()
{
  exit 0
}


postuninst ()
{
  #clean up profile mods
  sed -i "/${COMMENT}/d" /etc/profile
  sed -i "/${COMMENT}/d" /root/.profile

  #leave locale support in place on older DSM versions - too risky to delete system binaries
  
  exit 0
}
 

start-stop-status.sh

#!/bin/sh

JRE_PATH="`find /var/packages/${SYNOPKG_PKGNAME}/target/ -name jre`"
COMMENT="# Synology Java Package"
#set the current timezone for Java so that log timestamps are accurate, modern timezone names so DST works
SYNO_TZ=`cat /etc/synoinfo.conf | grep timezone | cut -f2 -d'"'`
#fix for DST time in DSM 5.2 thanks to MinimServer Syno package author
[ -e /usr/share/zoneinfo/Timezone/synotztable.json ] \
 && SYNO_TZ=`jq ".${SYNO_TZ} | .nameInTZDB" /usr/share/zoneinfo/Timezone/synotztable.json | sed -e "s/\"//g"` \
 || SYNO_TZ=`grep "^${SYNO_TZ}" /usr/share/zoneinfo/Timezone/tzname | sed -e "s/^.*= //"`

EnvCheck ()
#updates to DSM will reset these changes so check them each startup 
{
  #/etc/profile should contain 5 lines added by this package tagged with trailing comments
  COUNT=`grep -c "$COMMENT$" /etc/profile`
  if [ $COUNT != 5 ]; then

    #remove any existing mods
    sed -i "/${COMMENT}/d" /etc/profile

    #add required environment variables
    echo "PATH=\$PATH:${JRE_PATH}/bin ${COMMENT}" >> /etc/profile
    echo "JAVA_HOME=${JRE_PATH} ${COMMENT}" >> /etc/profile
    echo "CLASSPATH=.:${JRE_PATH}/lib ${COMMENT}" >> /etc/profile
    echo "LANG=en_US.utf8 ${COMMENT}" >> /etc/profile
    echo "export CLASSPATH JAVA_HOME LANG PATH ${COMMENT}" >> /etc/profile
  fi

  #/root/.profile should contain 3 lines added by this package tagged with trailing comments
  COUNT=`grep -c "$COMMENT$" /root/.profile`
  if [ $COUNT != 3 ]; then

    #remove any existing mods
    sed -i "/${COMMENT}/d" /root/.profile

    #add required environment variables
    echo "PATH=\$PATH:${JRE_PATH}/bin ${COMMENT}" >> /root/.profile
    echo "TZ='${SYNO_TZ}' ${COMMENT}" >> /root/.profile
    echo "export PATH TZ ${COMMENT}" >> /root/.profile
  fi

  #timezone needs setting each startup in case system value has changed
  sed -i "s%^TZ=.* ${COMMENT}%TZ='${SYNO_TZ}' ${COMMENT}%" /root/.profile

  #DSM versions older than 4.3 need locale support adding
  if [ ! -e /usr/bin/locale ]; then

    #build missing locale with UTF-8 support (don't think it matters which language)
    cp ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/bin/* /usr/bin
    cp -R ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/share/i18n /usr/share
    if [ ! -d /usr/lib/locale ]; then
      mkdir /usr/lib/locale
    fi
    localedef -c -f UTF-8 -i en_US en_US.utf8
  fi

  #DSM versions up to 5.1 are missing the zoneinfo timezone definitions which causes inaccurate log timestamps
  #thanks to CoolRaoul here: http://forum.synology.com/enu/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=69232#p310553
  #to revert, just remove everything apart from 'Timezone' 'zone.tab' from /usr/share/zoneinfo
  if [ ! -e /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/London ]; then
    cp -R ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/zoneinfo/* /usr/share/zoneinfo/
  fi

}

case $1 in
  start)
    EnvCheck
    source /etc/profile
    source /root/.profile

    #evidence of whether Java can start successfully is written to the package log
    java -version > ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/output.log 2>&1
    echo >> ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/output.log
    echo System installed locales: >> ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/output.log
    locale -a >> ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/output.log
    echo >> ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/output.log
    echo JAVA_HOME=$JAVA_HOME >> ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/output.log
    echo TZ=$TZ >> ${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/output.log

    exit 0
  ;;

  stop)
    exit 0
  ;;

  status)
    source /etc/profile
    source /root/.profile
    if [ -e "${JAVA_HOME}/bin/java" ]; then
      exit 0
    else
      exit 1
    fi
  ;;

  log)
    echo "${SYNOPKG_PKGDEST}/output.log"
    exit 0
  ;;

esac
 

install_uifile

[
  {
    "step_title": "Java Runtime Environment Selection",
    "items": [
      {
        "type": "singleselect",
        "desc": "Please select the Java version to install:",
        "subitems": [
          {
            "key": "WIZARD_JRE_EE",
            "desc": "Java SE Embedded 8 (smaller memory footprint, 32bit)",
            "defaultValue": true
          },
          {
            "key": "WIZARD_JRE_SE",
            "desc": "Java SE 8 (64bit)",
            "defaultValue": false
          }
        ]
      }
    ]
  },
  {
    "step_title": "Java Cryptography Strength Selection",
    "items": [
      {
        "type": "singleselect",
        "desc": "Please select Java Cryptographic Extension policy:",
        "subitems": [
          {
            "key": "WIZARD_JCE_STD",
            "desc": "Default Strong JCE policy - limited to AES-128 encryption",
            "defaultValue": true
          },
          {
            "key": "WIZARD_JCE_UL",
            "desc": "Unlimited Strength JCE policy - not permitted in some jurisdictions, see Oracle documentation",
            "defaultValue": false
          }
        ]
      }
    ]
  }
]
 

Changelog:

  • 0050 17/Apr/19 – Updated to Java 8u211, added support for DS119j
  • 0049 11/Apr/19 – Updated to Java 8u201, fixed issue where x86_64 CPUs would ignore user selection and always install 64bit Java SE
  • 0048 22/Aug/18 – Updated to Java 8u181, added option to select 64bit full Java SE for x86_64 CPUs
  • 0047 14/May/18 – Updated to Java 8u171
  • 0046 20/Feb/18 – Updated to Java 8u161, experimental aarch64 support
  • 0045 30/Oct/17 – Updated to Java 8u151, added support for new CPUs in x17 and x18 models
  • 0044 02/Aug/17 – Updated to Java 8u144
  • 0043 21/Jan/17 – Updated to Java 8u121
  • 0042 07/Jan/17 – Updated to Java 8u111, fixed Armada 370/XP systems running DSM 6.0 which had switched from soft to hard float ABI
  • 0041 25/Jul/16 – Added support for unlimited strength cryptography (default is strong)
  • 0040 20/Jul/16 – Updated to Java 8u101
  • 0039 26/Apr/16 – Updated to Java 8u91
  • 0038 24/Mar/16 – Updated to Java 8u77
  • 0037 07/Feb/16 – Updated to Java 8u73
  • 0036 26/Jan/16 – Updated to Java 8u71
  • 0035 14/Dec/15 – Updated to Java 8u65, added support for models DS716+ and DS216play
  • 0034 19/Aug/15 – Fixed timezone DST issue with DSM 5.2, added support for DS215+
  • 0033 07/Aug/15 – Updated to Java 8u51, PowerPC build remains at 8u6
  • 0032 13/Jul/15 – Fixed timezone issue with DSM 5.2, updated main blog post documentation
  • 0031 25/Jan/15 – Fixed issue with version 0030 for systems with more than one volume
  • 0030 21/Jan/15 – Improved temp folder detection, updated to Java 7u75 and Java 8u33 (Oracle did not publish a version for PowerPC)
  • 0029 25/Dec/14 – DSM timezone zone.tab file is no longer overwritten, which had been prompting a malware alert in DSM 5.1 Security Advisor
  • 0028 20/Oct/14 – Updated to Java 7u71, added missing zoneinfo timezone definitions to fix inaccurate timestamps for non-GMT timezones (checked every startup), switched native binary archives from .tgz to .tar.xz format to reduce size
  • 0027 18/Oct/14 – Updated Java 8 to 8u6, added support for Mindspeed Comcerto 2000 CPU in DS414j for Java 7 and Java 8
  • 0026 24/Jun/14 – DSM updates will no longer break Java
  • 0025 31/May/14 – Updated to Java 7u60
  • 0024 31/May/14 – Updated to Java 7u55
  • 0023 27/May/14 – Added Java 8 support
  • 0022 30/Jan/14 – Updated to Java 7u51
  • 0021 15/Nov/13 – Locale support is no longer downloaded and added to DSM 4.3 or newer since it’s already present
  • 0020 30/Oct/13 – Added support for Intel Atom Evansport and Armada XP CPUs in new DSx14 products, removed Early Access JDK 8 support since it did not run on the Armada SoCs
  • 0019 17/Oct/13 – Updated to Java 7u45
  • 0018 11/Oct/13 – Updated to Java 7u40, and JDK8 Early Access b106
  • 0017 05/Jun/13 – For Armada370 CPU changed from ARMv7 Server JVM to Client JVM since the Server one turned out to be unstable. Added support for Early Access JDK 8 for Armada 370.
  • 0016 21/May/13 – Added Armada370 CPU support (DS213j)
  • 0015 18/Apr/13 – Updated to Java 7u21, Java 6 Embedded seems to be no longer maintained by Oracle
  • 0014 13/Feb/13 – Fixed metadata for DSM 4.2 Package Center
  • 013 13/Dec/12 – Updated to Java 6u38 and Java 7u10
  • 012 10/Dec/12 – Installer script fetches native binaries separately to reduce bandwidth on repo hosting
  • 011 Added support for Freescale QorIQ PowerPC CPUs used in some Synology x13 series products, PowerQUICC PowerPC processors in previous Synology generations with older glibc versions are not supported
  • 010 updated to Java 6u34 and Java 7u6
  • 009 corrected timezone bug for Atlantic and Pacific timezones which may have caused error messages when in fact the package had installed correctly
  • 008 unified the build scripts
  • 007 included the locale binaries to simplify installation, fixed environment variables for root user (inc. timezone with DST support), displayed Java version information and env vars in Log tab, incremented Java to latest versions 6u32 and 7u4, fixed detection of renamed .tar.gz archives downloaded by Google Chrome
  • 006 fixed path issue for root user on non-bootstrapped systems, updated info link to refer back to this page, and improved description text
  • 005 incremented JRE versions to match new releases from Oracle
  • 004 forced check for existence of ‘public’ shared folder
  • 003 fixed a stupid typo that stopped 002 from working :)
  • 002 rewrote scripts to be easier to maintain, and to allow for web browsers that untar or rename the Java and toolchain binary bundles as they’re saved
  • 001 23/Aug/11 – fixed package repo support, defined as a non-runnable service, prevented more than one JRE being installed, saved files into actual package folder rather than @appstore/java now that package names can be separate from Package Center display names
  • v3 initial spk release (I think!)
 
 

Serviio 0.6 DLNA server on Synology NAS

Serviio-Synology

Update – I have released a Synology package for Serviio 0.6

 

Serviio is an excellent free Java DLNA media server by Petr Nejedly which focuses on minimizing the amount of unnecessary media transcoding, and maximizing the use of renderer devices’ supported features. Version 0.6 adds support for streaming content from online RSS feeds. Since the installation process has changed a lot, I decided to create a new post rather than edit the old one. The guide is accurate for Synology DSM 3.2 beta, and the one tricky section with wget-ssl also applies for DSM 3.1. Older DSM versions may vary.

In the Synology DSM go to Control Panel > Terminal > enable SSH.

Read this Synology wiki document about modifying your NAS carefully and install the bootstrap for your model. If you have previously been messing around with your unit and want to set it back to defaults, you can run the bootstrap again. It will prompt you to delete a couple of folders and reboot, whereupon you can start afresh.

Download the PuTTY SSH client if you’re using Windows – other operating systems will already allow you to SSH from the terminal. Give the session a name, set the remote character set to UTF-8 as shown and save it before you connect (to save time in future). This will ensure that all characters display properly. The Mac OS SSH client defaults to UTF-8.
PuTTY remote character set configuration

Connect to your NAS’s IP address using SSH. Use the root account (same password as admin). For Mac OS for instance, use ssh root@x.x.x.x. I suggest enabling a more descriptive shell prompt which should reduce the chance of accidentally being in the wrong directory:

sed -i -r 's/(^PS1=.*$)/#\1\n\1/' ~/.profile
sed -i -e 's/^PS1=.*$/PS1=\"\\w\\\$ \"/g' ~/.profile
source ~/.profile
 

sed (stream editor) is a powerful tool which uses regular expressions. The first command opens the file ~./profile searches for the line beginning with PS1= and duplicates it, commenting out the first copy (so the change can be undone). Then second command sets the value PS1=”\w\$ “ which changes the prompt to be the current directory followed by dollar sign and space characters.

To install the development tools. Type:

ipkg update
ipkg install optware-devel
 

It will halt and complain that package wget-ssl clashes with wget. Continue with:

cp /opt/bin/wget /opt/bin/wget-old
ipkg remove wget
cp /opt/bin/wget-old /opt/bin/wget
ipkg install libidn
ipkg install optware-devel
 

This time it will finish successfully.

Next we need to install Lame MP3 encoder, providing libmp3lame which will be compiled into FFmpeg, and the Nano text editor (much easier to use than vi), and fix up some other issues (thanks to Nicolas Jolet for these):

ipkg install lame
ipkg install nano
#-----coreutils ls has no colour output by default
mv /opt/bin/ls /opt/bin/ls.bak
ln -sf /bin/ls /opt/bin/ls
#-----coreutils uptime is broken
mv /opt/bin/uptime /opt/bin/uptime.bak
ln -sf /usr/bin/uptime /opt/bin/uptime
 

Download Java SE for Embedded 7 from Oracle, selecting the Linux build for the appropriate CPU. The ARM v5 version is required for the Marvell Kirkwood CPU Synology Products. Note that there is a PowerPC e500v2 version – the CPU core in Synology products which use the Freescale mpc85x3). Unfortunately for PowerPC Synology owners, this depends on a higher version of glibc than the Synology DSM provides for this architecture. Until JamVM supports Java 1.6, or Synology update to glibc 2.4 you won’t be able to follow this guide on PowerPC models. This situation may have changed since DSM 3.2 beta was released.

You will need to sign up to receive the Java download link by email. It’s free to use for non-commercial evaluation use. Use your computer to save it into the top level shared folder of your NAS, which will probably be /volume1/public on the NAS filesystem. Then:

cd /volume1/public
mv ejre-7-fcs-b147-linux-arm-sflt-headless-27_jun_2011.tar.gz /volume1/@tmp
cd /volume1/@tmp
tar xvzf ejre-7-fcs-b147-linux-arm-sflt-headless-27_jun_2011.tar.gz
mv ejre1.7.0 /opt/local/java
 

Synology’s Linux build has no localization support built in, though it does use UTF-8 character encoding for the filesystem. That’s no problem for storage, however the Java VM inherits the locale setting of the host OS. Since this is undefined, Serviio and all other Java software will default to US-ASCII which is a big problem if you have filenames with non-US characters. The solution is to obtain the missing files to add locale support from the Synology toolchain, which is distributed under the GPL. Many thanks to IWarez at the Subsonic forum for this fix, though it took me a good while to realise the required files are indeed included in the ARM toolchain:

#-----for ARM CPU
cd /volume1/@tmp
wget http://sourceforge.net/projects/dsgpl/files/DSM%203.1%20Tool%20Chains/Marvell%2088F628x%20Linux%202.6.32/gcc421_glibc25_88f628x.tgz
tar xvfz gcc421_glibc25_88f628x.tgz
cd arm-none-linux-gnueabi/arm-none-linux-gnueabi/libc/usr/bin
cp locale /opt/bin
cp localedef /opt/bin
cp -R arm-none-linux-gnueabi/arm-none-linux-gnueabi/libc/usr/share/i18n /usr/share
#-----keep another copy safe in case DSM is reinstalled later
cp -R arm-none-linux-gnueabi/arm-none-linux-gnueabi/libc/usr/share/i18n /opt/share
mkdir /usr/lib/locale
localedef -c -f UTF-8 -i en_US en_US.utf8

#-----for Intel CPU
cd /volume1/@tmp
wget http://sourceforge.net/projects/dsgpl/files/DSM%203.1%20Tool%20Chains/Intel%20x86%20Linux%202.6.32/gcc420_glibc236_pineview.tgz
tar xvfz gcc420_glibc236_pineview.tgz
cd i686-linux-gnu/i686-linux-gnu/bin
cp locale /opt/bin
cp localedef /opt/bin
cp -R i686-linux-gnu/i686-linux-gnu/share/i18n /usr/share
#-----keep another copy safe in case DSM is reinstalled later
cp -R i686-linux-gnu/i686-linux-gnu/share/i18n /opt/share
mkdir /usr/lib/locale
localedef -c -f UTF-8 -i en_US en_US.utf8

 

Now use nano to edit some configuration files (Ctrl-o saves, and Ctrl-x exits).
First edit the profile for all bash shell users:

nano /opt/etc/profile
 

Make the changes shown in bold:

#
# Bash initialization script
#

PS1=”[\u@\h \W]$ ”
PATH=/opt/sbin:/opt/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/opt/local/java/bin
LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/opt/lib:${LD_LIBRARY_PATH}
JAVA_HOME=/opt/local/java
LANG=en_US.utf8

export PS1 PATH LD_LIBRARY_PATH JAVA_HOME LANG

 

Save and exit. Next edit the profile for all ash shell users (root):

nano /etc/profile
 

Add the changes shown in bold:

#/etc/profile: system-wide .profile file for ash.
PATH=”$PATH:/bin:/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/syno/bin:/usr/syno/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/local/sbin
PATH=”$PATH:/opt/local/java/bin”
JAVA_HOME=/opt/local/java
LANG=en_US.utf8
export JAVA_HOME LANG

umask 022

 

Save and exit. Now install Serviio 0.6:

cd /volume1/@tmp
wget http://download.serviio.org/releases/serviio-0.6-linux.tar.gz
tar xvzf serviio-0.6-linux.tar.gz
mv serviio-0.6 /opt/local/serviio
 

Next, compile librtmp which FFmpeg will use to retrieve Adobe Flash streaming video, the libssl static libraries (which librtmp depends on), libz and libbz2 static libraries for FFmpeg.

#-----libz static lib (ipkg only provides shared)
wget http://zlib.net/zlib-1.2.5.tar.gz
tar xvfz zlib-1.2.5.tar.gz
cd zlib-1.2.5
./configure --prefix=/opt --static
make
make install
 

At this point ou will see the error “cp: missing destination file operand after `/opt/lib'” because the libz.so shared library wasn’t compiled and the install script tries to copy it nonetheless. libz.a which we need was built ok, so ignore and continue.

cd ..
#-----libbz2 static lib (ipkg only provides shared)
wget http://bzip.org/1.0.6/bzip2-1.0.6.tar.gz
tar xvfz bzip2-1.0.6.tar.gz
cd bzip2-1.0.6
make
make install PREFIX=/opt
cd ..

#-----libssl & libcrypto static libs (ipkg only provides shared)
ipkg install openssl-dev
wget http://www.openssl.org/source/openssl-0.9.8p.tar.gz
tar xvfz openssl-0.9.8p.tar.gz
cd openssl-0.9.8p
./config --prefix=/opt no-shared
make
cp libssl.a /opt/lib
cp libcrypto.a /opt/lib
#-----librtmp won't compile without these pkgconfig definitions
cp libssl.pc /opt/lib/pkgconfig
cp libcrypto.pc /opt/lib/pkgconfig
cd ..

#-----librtmp depends on libpthreads but the optware copy seems to be broken
#-----http://forum.synology.com/enu/viewtopic.php?f=90&t=30132
mkdir /opt/arm-none-linux-gnueabi/lib_disabled
mv /opt/arm-none-linux-gnueabi/lib/libpthread* /opt/arm-none-linux-gnueabi/lib_disabled
cp /lib/libpthread.so.0 /opt/arm-none-linux-gnueabi/lib/
cd /opt/arm-none-linux-gnueabi/lib/
ln -s libpthread.so.0 libpthread.so
ln -s libpthread.so.0 libpthread-2.5.so
cd /volume1/@tmp
wget http://download.serviio.org/opensource/rtmpdump-c58cfb3e9208c6e6bc1aa18f1b1d650d799084e5.tar.gz
tar xvfz rtmpdump-c58cfb3e9208c6e6bc1aa18f1b1d650d799084e5.tar.gz
cd rtmpdump
#-----move all static libs to a separate folder to force compiler to use them
#-----http://www.gossamer-threads.com/lists/apache/dev/265052
mkdir /volume1/@tmp/lib
cp /opt/lib/*.a /volume1/@tmp/lib
#-----fix Makefile (won't compile without libdl linked)
#-----http://forum.luahub.com/index.php?topic=2390.0
sed -i.bak -e '/^LIB_OPENSSL\=/s/lcrypto/lcrypto \-ldl/' Makefile
make SYS=posix prefix=/opt INC=-I/opt/include XLDFLAGS=-L/volume1/@tmp/lib SHARED=
make install prefix=/opt SHARED=
cd ..

#-----gather all static libs again ready for FFmpeg compile
cp /opt/lib/*.a /volume1/@tmp/lib

#-----remove unsupported URL line from /opt/lib/pkgconfig/librtmp.pc
#-----pkg-config --exists --print-errors librtmp
sed -i -e '/^URL/d' /opt/lib/pkgconfig/librtmp.pc

#-----FFmpeg 0.8.2 (slightly newer than the one at Serviio.org)
cd /volume1/@tmp
wget http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1188556/ffmpeg-HEAD-05a2673.tar.gz
tar xvfz ffmpeg-HEAD-05a2673.tar.gz
cd ffmpeg-HEAD-05a2673

#-----for ARM CPU
./configure --arch=arm --enable-armv5te --prefix=/opt --extra-cflags='-I/opt/include' --extra-ldflags='-L/volume1/@tmp/lib' --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-ffplay --disable-ffserver --enable-pthreads --enable-libmp3lame --enable-librtmp --extra-version=Serviio

#-----for Intel CPU
ipkg install yasm
./configure --arch=x86_64 --enable-ssse3 --prefix=/opt --extra-cflags='-I/opt/include' --extra-ldflags='-L/volume1/@tmp/lib' --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-ffplay --disable-ffserver --enable-pthreads --enable-libmp3lame --enable-librtmp --extra-version=Serviio

#-----for PowerPC CPU
./configure --arch=powerpc --disable-altivec --prefix=/opt --extra-cflags='-I/opt/include' --extra-ldflags='-L/volume1/@tmp/lib' --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-ffplay --disable-ffserver --enable-pthreads --enable-libmp3lame --enable-librtmp --extra-version=Serviio

make
make install
 

Notice that the ./configure command is line wrapped – it’s all one command. The make command takes approximately 25 minutes and will show many warnings during compilation, but this is expected.

Try running ffmpeg and check the compile time to make sure the newly compiled one is running. You should see this but with your compilation date and time:

ffmpeg version 0.8.2.git-05a2673-Serviio, Copyright (c) 2000-2011 the FFmpeg developers
built on Aug 22 2011 09:57:40 with gcc 4.2.3
configuration: –arch=arm –enable-armv5te –prefix=/opt –extra-cflags=-I/opt/include –extra-ldflags=’-L/volume1/@tmp/lib’ –enable-static –disable-shared –disable-ffplay –disable-ffserver –enable-pthreads –enable-libmp3lame –enable-librtmp –extra-version=Serviio
libavutil 51. 13. 0 / 51. 13. 0
libavcodec 53. 11. 0 / 53. 11. 0
libavformat 53. 9. 0 / 53. 9. 0
libavdevice 53. 3. 0 / 53. 3. 0
libavfilter 2. 34. 1 / 2. 34. 1
libswscale 2. 0. 0 / 2. 0. 0
Hyper fast Audio and Video encoder
usage: ffmpeg [options] [[infile options] -i infile]… {[outfile options] outfile}…

Use -h to get full help or, even better, run ‘man ffmpeg’

In the DSM User Control Panel create a new user called serviio and set a password. Give that user access to the paths that contain the media you want to serve. Click the User Home button and enable the User Home Service. Go back to your SSH session and type:

nano /etc/passwd
 

Be very careful editing this file. A wrong move here could trash your system. Notice that the serviio user has a shell of /sbin/nologin. Change this to /bin/sh like the admin user has. Nano may try to line wrap this line as you type if you added an long account description. If it does, delete the carriage return before the line break and pull it back onto one line. Save and exit.

Now we’ll create the Serviio daemon start and stop script:

nano /volume1/@tmp/S99serviio.sh
 

Paste in the following text (mouseover and use the view source button to copy):

#!/bin/sh

User=serviio

case "$1" in

stop)
        echo "Stop Serviio..."
        su -l $User -c "/opt/local/serviio/bin/serviio.sh -stop" > /dev/null 2>&1 &
        ;;

start)
        # start Serviio in background mode
        su -l $User -c "/opt/local/serviio/bin/serviio.sh" > /dev/null 2>&1 &
        echo "Start Serviio..."
        ;;

restart)
        $0 stop
        sleep 1
        $0 start
        ;;
*)
        echo "usage: $0 { start | stop | restart}" >&2
        exit 1
        ;;

esac
 

Now make it executable and set the serviio user to be the owner of the Serviio folder (so it can create the media database, and log files):

chmod +x /volume1/@tmp/S99serviio.sh
chown -R serviio /opt/local/serviio
 

Test the script manually by running:

/volume1/@tmp/S99serviio.sh start
ps
 

The running process list should show the serviio user running the Serviio launcher shell script and the JVM like so:

 5132 root     16988 S    /usr/syno/sbin/nmbd -D
 5134 admin    34804 S    postgres: admin photo [local] idle
 5187 root     21080 S    /usr/syno/sbin/smbd -D
 5189 root     21080 S    /usr/syno/sbin/smbd -D
 5205 root      7216 S    /usr/syno/sbin/cnid_metad -l log_error
 5207 root     13808 S    /usr/syno/sbin/afpd -g guest -c 256 -n DS111 AFPServ
 5253 root      9208 S N  /usr/syno/sbin/synomkflvd
 5317 root      4112 S    /usr/syno/sbin/sshd
 5332 root      6932 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd -f /usr/syno/apache/conf/
 5344 root      7068 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd -f /usr/syno/apache/conf/
 5345 root      7068 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd -f /usr/syno/apache/conf/
 5369 root      6928 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd
 5383 nobody    6928 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd
 5384 nobody    6928 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd
 5385 nobody    6928 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd
 5436 root      2408 S    avahi-daemon: running [DS111.local]
 5460 root     11928 S    sshd: root@pts/0
 5466 root      5452 S    -ash
 5582 root         0 SW   [flush-8:0]
 5602 serviio   2988 S    -sh -c /opt/local/serviio/bin/serviio.sh
 5605 serviio   2988 S    /bin/sh /opt/local/serviio/bin/serviio.sh
 5610 serviio   498m S    /opt/local/java/bin/java -Xmx384M -Djava.net.preferI
 5623 root      5452 R    ps
 

Stop the daemon with:

/volume1/@tmp/S99serviio.sh stop
 

Check the web UI or the process list again and make sure it did indeed stop. If it’s all ok, we need to move the daemon launcher script so it starts automatically on boot (it will survive a DSM upgrade):

mv /volume1/@tmp/S99serviio.sh /opt/etc/init.d
 

Shutdown the NAS and restart, checking that Serviio starts by itself.

From now on you can start and stop Serviio manually using this same script (say if you were experimenting with changes to profiles.xml for instance):

/opt/etc/init.d/S99serviio.sh stop
/opt/etc/init.d/S99serviio.sh start
 

Remote console

AcidumIrae’s PHP Web UI is only for Serviio up to version 0.5.2 at present, and at the time of writing the Java Restful Web UI by kairoh does not yet integrate with Serviio 0.6. The only option for now is to use the proper Serviio Console from another computer. Since 0.6 there is no longer a requirement to change anything at the server end, so you just need to pass the parameter -Dserviio.remoteHost=x.x.x.x to the Serviio Console to indicate the IP of your Serviio server. This is covered in the Serviio FAQ. There’s quite a lag for it to start up (at least on Windows), but eventually you see the familiar icon.

 

Serviio settings

Navigate to the Transcoding tab. Set the transcoded files location to /volume1/@tmp. Failure to do this will result in temporary files being written to /tmp which will fill up the partition it’s on the moment you remux a 4GB movie, which would prevent you from logging into the NAS. If your Synology has an Intel CPU set the number of transcoding threads to 2. The dual cores should take advantage of FFmpeg’s pthreads support for a decent performance boost.

I recommend de-selecting Generate thumbnails for local videos in the Metadata tab. Note that you have to click Save on each tab or any change will not take effect. As you’ll see if you have a DLNA renderer that supports thumbnails, Serviio retrieves good ones from the online databases it checks so they’re not really needed. Often FFmpeg will get stuck trying to generate a thumbnail for a video and will lock the CPU at 100% for long periods of time. This issue was raised in this Serviio forum thread.

You can use the Library tab to add the media folders you want to share. Use Add Path not Add Local (we’re using a remote console remember) and express the paths in Linux syntax, e.g. /volume1/public/videos. Be sure that the serviio user has been granted read privileges over the folders you add (User Control Panel in DSM).

 

Performance

The Synology seems perfectly able to transcode DTS audio in a hi-def Matroska file down to 2 channel AC3 in MPEG-TS while copying the H.264 stream. The CPU use leaps up to 100% but I guess that’s because it’s running ahead transcoding down to the end of the file (and is CPU-bound).

If I play something that’s only remuxing the container and copying both audio and video streams then the CPU stays at around 40% (because it’s I/O-bound) then 5 minutes into a film it falls away to pretty much idle – I guess it has finished remuxing to the temporary file.

Memory use even while running Serviio is around 20% at idle, 30% during a remux with audio transcode, though I have noticed that with a larger library this creeps up to around 70%. I have a 2011 product so it has 256MB of RAM. This seems to indicate that the value line of products (with the j suffix) like the DS211j should run Serviio on their 128MB. They have a 1.2GHz CPU though versus 1.6GHz on mine (and the DS110j is only 800MHz), so it would need testing by someone.

All in all it would seem that the Synology products are very capable Serviio appliances!

 

Uninstalling

Log in as root and stop Serviio, then in the DSM User Control Panel delete the user called serviio. Undo the changes that you made to /opt/etc/profile and /etc/profile (the LANG, JAVA_HOME and java path modifications marked in bold earlier in the guide).

Finally, re-download the bootstrap for your model of NAS and run it again. It will tell you to delete a few folders and restart. This will completely trash all optware ipkg packages (i.e. everything in /opt) and undo everything else you did in this guide without affecting your data partitions. If you had any other ipkg packages installed since installing Serviio, these would also be lost.

Compiling x64/x86 FFmpeg on 64bit Windows with libfaac and libmp3lame

Once I had compiled FFmpeg for 32bit Windows, I discovered that it’s probably ten times more difficult to find information about doing the same with free tools on 64bit editions of Windows. A perfect topic for PCLOADLETTER then!

For building FFmpeg we must use the build environment MinGW-w64 which is a separate version of MinGW. The complication is that even when compiling natively you need to use configuration options as if you’re cross compiling (for host type x86_64-w64-mingw32). It’s not strictly necessary with all packages, but some will fail to build without these parameters. As a result you have to search around trying to find all the necessary configure commands for each package, and they’re not always identical. It’s a slow and frustrating process. What’s even more confusing, is that some builds of MinGW-w64 are targetted at 32bit, some 64bit, and some both. What is more, I had to try three different ones before I found one that could compile LAME without errors (though that could be LAME’s fault).

Most people will want a toolchain with the flexibility to create both x64 and x86 binaries, so that is what I shall describe in this guide.

On the MinGW-w64 downloads site browse to the Multilib Toolchains (Targetting Win32 and Win64) section, and download the latest megasoft78 binary build prefixed with mingw-w64-bin_x86_64-mingw. Extract the contents of this archive to the root of your C: drive (which at time of writing will create a folder named mingw64_4.5.2_multilib).

There is no installer – it’s not as automated as the 32bit distribution of MinGW. I spent a long time trying to compile LAME with the official MSYS build and eventually gave up, chosing instead to use a working one made by a third party. Download MSYS_MinGW_GCC_460_x86-x64_Full.7z from xhmikosr.1f0.de. Extract that archive into C:\mingw64_4.5.2_multilib so you have a subfolder in there named MSYS.

Update – I now realise that this archive also includes the whole GCC toolchain as well, but by then I’d already written the guide :)

Download the latest DirectX SDK. Install it, but only select the following component:
DirectX SDK installation options

This document provides useful background information to the uninitiated. Crucially it explains that when you compile with a particular host type defined, most configure scripts will look for a compiler whose filename is prefixed with that host type. So gcc.exe might be present in the toolchain distro as x86_64-w64-mingw32-gcc.exe. The toolchain I just recommended you download does not contain prefixes, but we shall need them since FFmpeg’s configure script expects them. On Windows Vista or later (which should cover most 64bit Windows systems) we can use mklink.exe to create symbolic links. We’ll also copy some missing DirectX headers into the toolchain and configure MSYS.

Start a Command Prompt as Administrator:

cd \mingw64_4.5.2_multilib\bin\
for %i in (*.exe) do mklink x86_64-w64-mingw32-%i %i
copy /y "%DXSDK_DIR%\Include\*.*" C:\mingw64_4.5.2_multilib\x86_64-w64-mingw32\include\
cd \mingw64_4.5.2_multilib\msys\postinstall
pi
 

This will launch the post-install script which will configure a filesystem mount for /mingw. When asked, enter your mingw installation path as c:/mingw64_4.5.2_multilib

Once that’s complete, launch the MSYS shell from your Administrator command prompt:

C:\mingw64_4.5.2_multilib\MSYS\msys.bat
 

Download the source .tar.gz files of:

Copy those downloaded files to C:\mingw64_4.5.2_multilib\msys\home\administrator (since you’re running in the Administrator user context). In the MSYS shell this is your home directory (cd ~).

In the MSYS shell, run:

tar xvfz faac-1.28.tar.gz
tar xvfz lame-3.98.4.tar.gz
tar xvfz ffmpeg-HEAD-6fd00e9.tar.gz
 

For a 64bit compile of FFmpeg with libfaac and libmp3lame:

cd ~/faac-1.28
./configure --prefix=/usr/local/x86_64-w64-mingw32 --host=x86_64-w64-mingw32 --enable-static --disable-shared --with-mp4v2=no
make clean && make
make install
cd ..
cd lame-3.98.4
./configure --prefix=/usr/local/x86_64-w64-mingw32 --host=x86_64-w64-mingw32 --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-decoder --enable-nasm
make clean && make
make install
cd ..
cd ffmpeg-HEAD-6fd00e9
CPPFLAGS="$CPPFLAGS -I/usr/local/x86_64-w64-mingw32/include" ./configure --extra-ldflags='-L/usr/local/x86_64-w64-mingw32/lib' --prefix=/usr/local/x86_64-w64-mingw32 --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-ffplay --disable-ffserver --enable-memalign-hack --enable-libmp3lame --enable-nonfree --enable-libfaac --arch=x86_64 --enable-runtime-cpudetect --enable-w32threads --cross-prefix=x86_64-w64-mingw32- --target-os=mingw32
make clean && make
make install
 

The compiled ffmpeg.exe will be in C:\mingw64_4.5.2_multilib\MSYS\local\x86_64-w64-mingw32\bin.

In summary what’s happening is we’re compiling FAAC without MP4v2 support (compilation halts if that’s enabled), and we’re making sure the binaries are stored in /usr/local/x86_64-w64-mingw32. Likewise for LAME. FFmpeg needs to be told where to find these new libraries (and headers too). We’re also installing it to /usr/local/x86_64-w64-mingw32, so as to keep x64 and x86 binaries separated.

 

For a 32bit compile of FFmpeg with libfaac and libmp3lame:

cd ~/faac-1.28
CFLAGS="-m32" CXXFLAGS="-m32" ./configure --prefix=/usr/local/i686-pc-mingw32 --host=x86_64-w64-mingw32 --enable-static --disable-shared --with-mp4v2=no
make clean && make
make install
cd ..
cd lame-3.98.4
CFLAGS="-m32" CXXFLAGS="-m32" ./configure --prefix=/usr/local/i686-pc-mingw32 --host=x86_64-w64-mingw32 --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-decoder --enable-nasm
make clean && make
make install
cd ..
cd ffmpeg-HEAD-6fd00e9
CPPFLAGS="$CPPFLAGS -I/usr/local/i686-pc-mingw32/include" ./configure --extra-cflags=-m32 --extra-ldflags='-m32 -L/usr/local/i686-pc-mingw32/lib' --prefix=/usr/local/i686-pc-mingw32 --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-ffplay --disable-ffserver --enable-memalign-hack --enable-libmp3lame --enable-nonfree --enable-libfaac --arch=x86_32 --enable-runtime-cpudetect --enable-w32threads --cross-prefix=x86_64-w64-mingw32- --target-os=mingw32
make clean && make
make install
 

The compiled ffmpeg.exe will be in C:\mingw64_4.5.2_multilib\MSYS\local\i686-pc-mingw32\bin.

This is pretty much the same as before, but CFLAGS=”-m32″ and CXXFLAGS=”-m32″ force the 64bit-native C and C++ compilers to produce 32bit binaries. I found that useful option at the bottom of this FFmpeg wiki page. As usual, FFmpeg has its own way of specifying most of these settings (except CPPFLAGS). It is also instructed to use 32bit libraries via –extra-ldflags=’-m32′.

 

Footnote

Until I gave up and used the MSYS distro from xhmikosr.1f0.de, LAME persistently failed to compile with the error undefined reference to `init_xrpow_core_sse’. I tried a newer version of NASM than 2.09.08, replacing nasm.exe with yasm.exe, using LAME 3.98.2 instead of 3.98.4, disabling NASM in the configure, using the Unix makefile, all to no avail. Apart from a problem someone had compiling a Mac universal binary (fixed by using compiler options I could not use with MinGW), the only other link I could find about this is here, and that’s also unsolved. Even taking the nasm.exe (which I notice is 32bit) from the working MSYS bundle and trying it with the SourceForge ‘official’ MSYS bundle, I cannot get LAME to compile. I had no such problem when using the normal MinGW on my 32bit PC from my previous post on this subject, despite compiling my own nasm.exe. If you have any insight into why this might be, please leave a comment!

 

Compiling FFmpeg for Windows with libfaac and libmp3lame

Having realised how simple it is to compile stuff on my Synology NAS I decided to finally get something built on Windows using free tools. It’s not really much different, but I had to do a lot of searching to finally gather all the necessary configure parameters.

First we need to set up the build environment. MinGW stands for ‘Minimalist GNU for Windows’. Download the MinGW-get installer, which will install everything you’ll need including MSYS which is a Unix shell complete with all the essential binaries. Run the MinGW-get installer and select Download latest repository catalogs.
In the options add the C++ compiler (needed for FAAC) and select MSYS Basic System and MinGW Developer Toolkit.

Now download the source .tar.gz files of:

Launch MinGW Shell from the Start Menu.
Copy those downloaded files to C:\MinGW\msys\1.0\home\yourusername
For each one run:

tar xvfz packagename.tar.gz
 

Then in order, cd into each extracted directory and…

For NASM and yasm:

./configure
make
make install
 

For FAAC (we need to disable the mp4v2 option to avoid a nasty compiler error – took me a long time to discover):

./bootstrap CC='gcc -mno-cygwin'
./configure --prefix=/mingw --exec-prefix=/mingw --enable-static --disable-shared --with-mp4v2=no
make
make install
 

For LAME:

./configure --prefix=/mingw --exec-prefix=/mingw --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-decoder --enable-nasm
make
make install
 

For FFmpeg:

./configure --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-ffplay --disable-ffserver --enable-memalign-hack --enable-libmp3lame --enable-nonfree --enable-libfaac --arch=x86 --enable-runtime-cpudetect --enable-w32threads
make
make install
 

The compiled ffmpeg.exe will be in C:\MinGW\msys\1.0\local\bin

Update – I tried to set this up on my work PC which runs 64 bit Windows 7 and I discovered that it’s a world of pain, so I’ll have to amend this post once I solve it.

Serviio 0.5.2 DLNA server on Synology NAS

last updated 24/08/2011 – fixed typos in locale section
Serviio-Synology

This guide is now redundant – I have released a Synology package for Serviio 0.6!

 

Serviio is an excellent free Java DLNA media server by Petr Nejedly which focuses on minimizing the amount of unnecessary media transcoding, and maximizing the use of renderer devices’ supported features. Some of the more main-stream servers like Windows Media Player just brute-force everything to MPEG2 video and MP3 audio, which degrades quality and wastes power. Though some servers like Mezzmo are better and will play Matroska files, even they tend to transcode all audio to AC-3 regardless of source type. As a Java app Serviio will run on anything that has a JVM, and the media tool it relies on is the open source and therefore highly portable FFmpeg. All these design priorities make Serviio an ideal choice to run on a NAS device since, when paired with a renderer with good format support like a Sony Bluray Player, the NAS will barely ever be transcoding.

I was about to buy a new large external hard disk, but once I realised that Serviio could probably run on a NAS I started looking at one of these instead. Synology seemed to offer a lot of value and seemed to have the sort of user-community enjoyed by my old Linksys NSLU2, which I promptly sold on eBay for almost what I had paid for it in 2007. I considered the value DS110j model but I decided to go for the more expensive DS111 on the basis that the double CPU speed and RAM would probably be a wise move.

This guide outlines how to get Serviio 0.5.2 running on the Marvell Kirkwood ARM CPUs found in most of the 2011 product line-up, but Synology devices also exist with Freescale PowerPC and Intel Atom processors. The key problem is finding a Java virtual machine, but FFmpeg also needs compiling from source. This is because although there is an FFmpeg binary bundled with DSM 3.0, it’s too old and lacks support for features critical to Serviio. This guide could be used for other CPU architectures, but the compilation options for FFmpeg need adapting.

In the Synology DSM go to Control Panel > Terminal > enable SSH.

Read this Synology wiki document about modifying your NAS carefully and install the bootstrap for your model.

Download the PuTTY SSH client.

Connect to your NAS’s IP address using SSH. Use the root account (same password as admin). I suggest that you perform the mod at the bottom of this post to enable colour directory listings and a more descriptive shell prompt which should reduce the chance of accidentally being in the wrong directory.

We need to install the development tools. Type:

ipkg install optware-devel
 

It will halt and complain that package wget-ssl clashes with wget. Continue with:

ipkg remove wget
cp /usr/syno/bin/wget /opt/bin
ipkg install wget-ssl
ipkg update
ipkg upgrade
ipkg install optware-devel
 

This time it will finish successfully.

Update – It seems that there is a serious problem with running ipkg on a clean install of DSM 3.1. This guide was written before it was released, and though I have since upgraded my Synology I haven’t encountered that issue, but there have been many comments about it. User mayk on the Synology forum seems to have the solution here. Use the extra wget verbosity switch to find out the exact package URL for the following two packages, then manually download them with wget and install:

cd /volume1/@tmp
ipkg install -verbose_wget libidn
wget url1
ipkg install -verbose_wget wget-ssl
wget url2
ipkg install filename1
ipkg install filename2
 

Next we need to install Lame MP3 encoder, providing libmp3lame which FFmpeg will be compiled to depend on, and the Nano text editor (much easier to use than vi):

ipkg install lame
ipkg install nano
 

JamVM is a JVM that gets mentioned a lot in connection with NAS systems, but it’s only Java 1.5, and Serviio needs version 1.6. Download the Java SE Embedded Runtime from Oracle, selecting the ARM v5 Linux version (note that there is a PowerPC e500v2 version – the CPU core in Synology products which use the Freescale mpc85x3). Unfortunately for PowerPC Synology owners, this depends on a higher version of glibc than the Synology DSM provides for this architecture. Until JamVM supports Java 1.6, or Synology update to glibc 2.4 you won’t be able to follow this guide on PowerPC models. This may have changed since DSM 3.1 was released.

You will need to sign up to receive the download link by email. It’s free to use for non-commercial self-educational use. Use your computer to save it into the top level shared folder of your NAS, which will probably be /volume1/public on the NAS filesystem. Then:

cd /volume1/public
mv ejre-1_6_0_21-fcs-b09-linux-arm-sflt-eabi-headless-27_sep_2010.tar.gz /volume1/@tmp
cd /volume1/@tmp
tar xvzf ejre-1_6_0_21-fcs-b09-linux-arm-sflt-eabi-headless-27_sep_2010.tar.gz
mkdir /opt/java
mv ejre1.6.0_21 /opt/java
 

Synology’s Linux build has no localisation support built in, though it does use UTF-8 character encoding for the filesystem. That’s no problem for storage, however the Java VM inherits the locale setting of the host OS. Since this is undefined Serviio, and all other Java software, will default to US-ASCII which is a big problem if you have filenames with non-US characters. The solution is to obtain the missing files to add locale support from the Synology toolchain, which is distributed under the GPL:

#-----for ARM CPU
cd /volume1/@tmp
wget http://sourceforge.net/projects/dsgpl/files/DSM%203.1%20Tool%20Chains/Marvell%2088F628x%20Linux%202.6.32/gcc421_glibc25_88f628x.tgz
tar xvfz gcc421_glibc25_88f628x.tgz
cd arm-none-linux-gnueabi/arm-none-linux-gnueabi/libc/usr/bin
cp locale /opt/bin
cp localedef /opt/bin
cp -R arm-none-linux-gnueabi/arm-none-linux-gnueabi/libc/usr/share/i18n /usr/share
#-----keep another copy safe in case DSM is reinstalled later
cp -R arm-none-linux-gnueabi/arm-none-linux-gnueabi/libc/usr/share/i18n /opt/share
mkdir /usr/lib/locale
localedef -c -f UTF-8 -i en_US en_US.utf8

#-----for Intel CPU
cd /volume1/@tmp
wget http://sourceforge.net/projects/dsgpl/files/DSM%203.1%20Tool%20Chains/Intel%20x86%20Linux%202.6.32/gcc420_glibc236_pineview.tgz
tar xvfz gcc420_glibc236_pineview.tgz
cd i686-linux-gnu/i686-linux-gnu/bin
cp locale /opt/bin
cp localedef /opt/bin
cp -R i686-linux-gnu/i686-linux-gnu/share/i18n /usr/share
#-----keep another copy safe in case DSM is reinstalled later
cp -R i686-linux-gnu/i686-linux-gnu/share/i18n /opt/share
mkdir /usr/lib/locale
localedef -c -f UTF-8 -i en_US en_US.utf8
 

Now use nano to edit some configuration files (Ctrl-o saves, and Ctrl-x exits).
First edit the profile for all bash shell users:

nano /opt/etc/profile
 

Make the changes shown in bold:

#
# Bash initialization script
#

PS1=”[\u@\h \W]$ ”
PATH=/opt/sbin:/opt/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/opt/java/ejre1.6.0_21/bin
LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/opt/lib:${LD_LIBRARY_PATH}
JAVA_HOME=/opt/java/ejre1.6.0_21
LANG=en_US.utf8

export PS1 PATH LD_LIBRARY_PATH JAVA_HOME LANG

 

Save and exit. Next edit the profile for all ash shell users (root):

nano /etc/profile
 

At the last line make the changes in bold:

PATH=/opt/java/ejre1.6.0_21/bin:/opt/bin:/opt/sbin:$PATH
JAVA_HOME=/opt/java/ejre1.6.0_21
LANG=en_US.utf8
export JAVA_HOME LANG

 

Save and exit. Now install the Serviio application:

cd /volume1/@tmp
wget http://download.serviio.org/releases/serviio-0.5.2-linux.tar.gz
tar xvzf serviio-0.5.2-linux.tar.gz
mv serviio-0.5.2 /opt/serviio
 

In the DSM Control Panel got to Web Services > Web Applications tab > Enable Web Station.
Install AcidumIrae’s PHP web UI for Serviio. You will need to have enabled Web Station for the directory /volume1/web to exist.

wget http://labs.softjourn.com/attachments/download/67/serviio-0.5.2.1b.zip
unzip serviio-0.5.2.1b.zip
mv serviio-0.5.2 /volume1/web/serviio
 

You should already be able to browse to http://your_NAS_IP/serviio and see the user interface, though it will complain with a big red X that Serviio is not running.

FFmpeg depends on the libbz2 and zlib libraries, and although both are installed along with the optware-devel package, FFmpeg will only look for them in /lib rather than in their actual location in /opt/lib. Copies of the existing symbolic links will be fine:

cp /opt/lib/libbz2.so.1.0 /lib
cp /opt/lib/libz.so.1 /lib
 

Compile the patched version 26303 of FFmpeg from the Serviio download page. Running cat /proc/cpuinfo it is clear that the DS111 is an ARM 5TE platform so I enabled those specific optimizations:

cd /volume1/@tmp
wget http://download.serviio.org/opensource/ffmpeg-26303.tar.gz
tar xvzf ffmpeg-26303.tar.gz
cd ffmpeg
./configure --arch=arm --enable-armv5te --prefix=/opt --extra-cflags='-I/opt/include' --extra-ldflags='-L/opt/lib' --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-ffplay --disable-ffserver --enable-libmp3lame
make
 

Notice that the ./configure command is line wrapped – it’s all one command. The make command takes approximately 25 minutes on the 1.6GHz CPU and will show many warnings during compilation, but this is expected.

Update – Thanks to bakman for pointing out that for Intel Atom CPUs you will need to install the assembler YASM and also use the following ./configure parameters:

ipkg install yasm
./configure --arch=x86_64 --enable-ssse3 --prefix=/opt --extra-cflags='-I/opt/include' --extra-ldflags='-L/opt/lib' --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-ffplay --disable-ffserver --enable-libmp3lame
 

Another Update – Thanks to gregorio for parameters for Freescale PowerPC processors:

./configure --arch=powerpc --disable-altivec --prefix=/opt --extra-cflags='-I/opt/include' --extra-ldflags='-L/opt/lib' --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-ffplay --disable-ffserver --enable-libmp3lame
 

When the compile is done, install it.

make install
 

Try running ffmpeg and check the compile time to make sure the newly compiled one is running. You should see this but with your compilation date and time:

FFmpeg version UNKNOWN, Copyright (c) 2000-2011 the FFmpeg developers
built on Feb 6 2011 01:14:38 with gcc 4.2.3
configuration: –arch=arm –enable-armv5te –prefix=/opt –extra-cflags=-I/opt/include –extra-ldflags=-L/opt/lib –enable-static –disable-shared –disable-ffplay –disable-ffserver –enable-libmp3lame
libavutil 50.36. 0 / 50.36. 0
libavcore 0.16. 0 / 0.16. 0
libavcodec 52.108. 0 / 52.108. 0
libavformat 52.92. 0 / 52.92. 0
libavdevice 52. 2. 3 / 52. 2. 3
libavfilter 1.72. 0 / 1.72. 0
libswscale 0.12. 0 / 0.12. 0
Hyper fast Audio and Video encoder
usage: ffmpeg [options] [[infile options] -i infile]… {[outfile options] outfile}…

Use -h to get full help or, even better, run ‘man ffmpeg’

If you see the text below then something is wrong – this is the version included with DSM 3.0:

FFmpeg version SVN-r20167-snapshot, Copyright (c) 2000-2009 Fabrice Bellard, et al.

In the DSM User Control Panel create a new user called serviio and set a password. Give that user access to the paths that contain the media you want to serve. Click the User Home button and enable the User Home Service. Go back to your SSH session and type:

nano /etc/passwd
 

Be very careful editing this file. A wrong move here could trash your system. Notice that the serviio user has a shell of /sbin/nologin. Change this to /bin/sh like the admin user has. Nano may try to line wrap this line as you type if you added an long account description. If it does, delete the carriage return before the line break and pull it back onto one line. Save and exit.

Now we’ll create the Serviio daemon start and stop script:

nano /volume1/@tmp/S99serviio.sh
 

Paste in the following text (mouseover and use the icon in the top right to copy):

#!/bin/sh

User=serviio

case "$1" in

stop)
        echo "Stop Serviio..."
        su -l $User -c "/opt/serviio/bin/serviio.sh -stop" > /dev/null 2>&1 &
        ;;

start)
        # start Serviio in background mode
        su -l $User -c "/opt/serviio/bin/serviio.sh" > /dev/null 2>&1 &
        echo "Start Serviio..."

        #check libs FFmpeg depends on (in case DSM was upgraded)
        if [ ! -f /lib/libbz2.so.1.0 ]; then
                cp /opt/lib/libbz2.so.1.0 /lib
        fi
        if [ ! -f /lib/libz.so.1 ]; then
                cp /opt/lib/libz.so.1 /lib
        fi
        ;;

restart)
        $0 stop
        sleep 1
        $0 start
        ;;
*)
        echo "usage: $0 { start | stop | restart}" >&2
        exit 1
        ;;

esac
 

Now make it executable and set the serviio user to be the owner of the Serviio folder (so it can create the media database, and log files):

chmod +x /volume1/@tmp/S99serviio.sh
chown -R serviio /opt/serviio
 

Test the script manually by running:

/volume1/@tmp/S99serviio.sh start
ps
 

The running process list should show the serviio user running the Serviio launcher shell script and the JVM like so:

 2542 root      9080 S N  /usr/syno/sbin/synomkflvd
 2589 root      3908 S    /usr/syno/sbin/sshd
 2591 root      5376 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd -f /usr/syno/apache/conf/
 2599 root      5944 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd -f /usr/syno/apache/conf/
 2600 root      5936 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd -f /usr/syno/apache/conf/
 2628 root     58920 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd
 2687 nobody   58920 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd
 2688 nobody   58920 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd
 2689 nobody   59500 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd
 2695 root     11560 S    /usr/syno/sbin/mDNSResponder -f /tmp/mDNSResponder.c
 2703 root      5568 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd -f /usr/syno/apache/conf/
 2949 root      5568 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd -f /usr/syno/apache/conf/
 3025 root      5568 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd -f /usr/syno/apache/conf/
 3087 root      8664 S N  /bin/ntfs-3g -o uid=1024,gid=100 /dev/sdk1 /volumeUS
 3518 root      8852 S    /usr/syno/sbin/cnid_metad
 3524 root     15132 S    /usr/syno/sbin/afpd -c 256 -g guest -n SynologyDS111
 3566 nobody   58920 S    /usr/syno/apache/bin/httpd
 7747 root      6660 S    sshd: root@pts/0
 7826 root      5404 S    -ash
13567 serviio   2940 S    -sh -c /opt/serviio/bin/serviio.sh
13570 serviio   2940 S    /bin/sh /opt/serviio/bin/serviio.sh
13575 serviio   501m S    /opt/java/ejre1.6.0_21/bin/java -Xmx384M -Djava.net.
13917 root      5404 R    ps
 

Stop the daemon with:

/volume1/@tmp/S99serviio.sh stop
 

Check the web UI or the process list again and make sure it did indeed stop. If it’s all ok, we need to move the daemon launcher script so it starts automatically on boot:

mv /volume1/@tmp/S99serviio.sh /opt/etc/init.d
 

Shutdown the NAS and restart.

Update – previously I had used the directory /usr/syno/etc/rc.d, but this is destroyed when the DSM software is updated. /usr/local/etc/rc.d is the official Synology location for 3rd party daemon init scripts but I found that it doesn’t work, so I used /opt/etc/init.d instead which also survives a DSM upgrade. I just tested this by upgrading to DSM 3.1-1605 and Serviio remained intact. I only had to copy the sym links for the libraries FFmpeg needs (“cp /opt/lib/libbz2.so.1.0 /lib” and “cp /opt/lib/libz.so.1 /lib”).

 

Web UI integration with the Synology DSM

I read the official Synology notes for 3rd party developers and decided to make some icons. The result is pretty neat:

Open an SSH session:

cd /usr/syno/synoman/webman/3rdparty
wget http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1188556/blog/serviio_syno_DSM.zip
unzip serviio_syno_DSM.zip
rm serviio_syno_DSM.zip
nano serviio/config
 

The file loaded into nano will look like this, and you need to edit the IP address to match the IP of your Synology (either put your syno on a static IP, or set a reservation in your broadband router’s DHCP server options).

{
 ".url": {
    "org.serviio.serviio": {
      "type": "legacy",
      "allUsers": true,
      "title": "Serviio",
      "desc": "DLNA Media Server",
      "icon": "images/icon_{0}.png",
      "url": "http://192.168.1.202/serviio/index.php"
    }
  }
}
 

I can’t find a way to avoid manually specifying the IP address like this – relative paths can’t be used because the Synology runs two different webservers: the DSM one on port 5000 without PHP, and the PHP-enabled Web Station one on port 80.

Log out of DSM and log back in. You will see the Serviio icon in the pull down menu in the top left, which you can drag to the desktop if you prefer:

 

Serviio settings

Navigate to the Transcoding tab. Set the transcoded files location to /volume1/@tmp. Failure to do this will result in temporary files being written to /tmp which will fill up the partition it’s on the moment you remux a 4GB movie, which would prevent you from logging into the NAS.

I recommend de-selecting Generate thumbnails for local videos in the Metadata tab. Note that you have to click Save on each tab or any change will not take effect. As you’ll see if you have a DLNA renderer that supports thumbnails, Serviio retrieves good ones from the online databases it checks so they’re not really needed. Often FFmpeg will get stuck trying to generate a thumbnail for a video and will lock the CPU at 100% for long periods of time. This issue was raised in this Serviio forum thread.

You can use the Library tab to add the media folders you want to share. Note that the Add Local… button will fail because the web service user does not have access to the root of the filesystem (probably a good thing security-wise). Use Add Path… instead and express the paths as I have done in the first screenshot above. Be sure that the serviio user has been granted read privileges over the folders you add (User Control Panel in DSM).

Update – If you really want to use the Ajax file browser UI, then go to DSM Control Panel > Web Services > PHP Settings tab > open_basedir and append /volume1: to the start of that list. Then on the Web Applications tab, disable Web Station, Ok, enable Web Station. Go back to your SSH session and run:

nano /volume1/web/serviio/afb/config.php
 

Change the value of $path from / to /volume1/public (or the top level shared folder where your media resides). You’ll notice however that when you use Add local button in the Serviio Library tab it’s very buggy. It will only list a maximum of 5 child folders from each node.

 

Performance

The Synology seems perfectly able to transcode DTS audio in a hi-def Matroska file down to 2 channel AC3 in MPEG-TS while copying the H.264 stream. The CPU use leaps up to 100% but I guess that’s because it’s running ahead transcoding down to the end of the file (and is CPU-bound).

If I play something that’s only remuxing the container and copying both audio and video streams then the CPU stays at around 40% (because it’s I/O-bound) then 5 minutes into a film it falls away to pretty much idle – I guess it has finished remuxing to the temporary file.

Memory use even while running Serviio is around 20% at idle, 30% during a remux with audio transcode, though I have noticed that with a larger library this creeps up to around 70%. I have a 2011 product so it has 256MB of RAM. This seems to indicate that the value line of products (with the j suffix) like the DS211j should run Serviio on their 128MB. They have a 1.2GHz CPU though versus 1.6GHz on mine (and the DS110j is only 800MHz), so it would need testing by someone.

All in all it would seem that the Synology products are very capable Serviio appliances!

 

Uninstalling

Log in as root and stop Serviio, then delete a couple of libraries which had been copied to /lib:

/opt/etc/init.d/S99serviio.sh stop
rm /lib/libbz2.so.1.0
rm /lib/libz.so.1
 

In the DSM User Control Panel delete the user called serviio. Undo the changes that you made to /opt/etc/profile and /etc/profile (the JAVA_HOME and java path modifications marked in bold earlier in the guide).

To remove the web UI, in DSM go to Web Services > Web Applications tab > Disable Web Station. Then:

rm -r /volume1/web/serviio
rm -r /usr/syno/synoman/webman/3rdparty/serviio
 

Finally, re-download the bootstrap for your model of NAS and run it again. It will tell you to delete a few folders and restart. This will completely trash all optware ipkg packages (i.e. everything in /opt) and undo everything else you did in this guide without affecting your data partitions. If you had any other ipkg packages installed since installing Serviio, these would also be lost.

Synology DiskStation SSH Tunnelling

Included in the SSH specification is the hugely overlooked ability to tunnel traffic. Looking on the Synology forums and the Web in general I saw plenty of articles and blog posts on how to enable port forwarding on your router for all the various services these appliances can provide. Many of these services transmit their data in non-encrypted form, with passwords being sent in clear text. However, there is a better way – one that can allow you secure remote access to absolutely anything on your home LAN. I had used this method to connect to my hacked TiVo many years ago because its web interface didn’t have the option of SSL. I did find some Synology-specific info about it, but I suspect it was from much earlier DSM versions which perhaps didn’t have a decent SSH daemon, and so called for additional packages to be installed. I was sure that there must be a simple way to tweak the config of the existing daemon. Luckily I found this blog post which seems to be quite hard to find via Google.

UPDATE – no config changes are necessary, at least with DSM 3.2 onwards (can’t remember for 3.1).

The concept is simple. You connect via SSH with PuTTY, but in setting up the connection you define some port mappings. So let’s say you wanted to be able to remotely use the DSM software on TCP5000, you can define a local port of say 8500 and remap that to the private IP of your Synology NAS at home on port 5000 (so 192.168.1.202:5000 in my case):

PuTTY tunnel settings

Don’t forget to click Add. Also in the options navigate to Window > Translation and set the character set to UTF-8.

Once you’re connected in PuTTY, point a browser to http://localhost:8500 and you’ll be connected to the DSM at the other end of the SSH tunnel – and securely too.

If you’re using a Mac or Linux computer the normal SSH client can be configured similarly from the terminal, e.g.:
ssh root@mynasip -L 8500:192.168.1.202:5000 -L 8123:192.168.1.202:8123

One final little mod is to enable coloured output in directory listings, and displaying of the current directory path in the shell prompt. Type:

echo alias ls="'ls --color'" >> ~/.profile
echo export PS1="'\w\$ '" >> ~/.profile
 

This will take effect at next logon. Directories are blue, executables are green, and symbolic links are cyan.

Shell colour directory listing